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IntroductionToNetworks-LabWork

This page lists the curriculum references and titles of all Introduction to Networking Hands-on Labs and Class Activities. Diagram descriptions and accessibility modifications are included where required.

Embedded Packet Tracer activities, Interactive activities, and Syntax Checker activities are not accessible and are therefore not included on this page unless an accessible alternate activity has been developed.

Unless provided on this page, refer to the course curriculum for the full text of each lab and activity.

Please note that this page is currently being redeveloped and some content will continue to be uploaded and/or changed over the next few weeks - 10 June 2015

Chapter 1: Exploring the network

1.0.1.2: Class Activity - Draw Your Concept of the Internet

Accessibility modification:
Instead of sketching a home or a school network topology and your concept of the Internet, write a paragraph that you think describes an equivalent topology.

1.1.1.8: Lab - Researching Network Collaboration Tools

The diagrams associated with this lab are described within the lab text.

1.2.3.3 Lab – Researching converged Network Services

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this lab.

1.3.1.3 Lab - Mapping the Internet

The instructions for the accessible portions of this lab are given on this page to provide context for the numerous descriptions of command line output graphics in the original lab.

Objectives

Part 1: Test Network Connectivity Using Ping
Part 2: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Windows Tracert
Part 3: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Web-Based and Software Tools
Part 4: Compare Traceroute Results

Background

Route tracing computer software is a utility that lists the networks data has to traverse from the users originating end device to a distant destination network.
This network tool is typically executed at the command line as:
tracert <destination network name or end device address> In Microsoft windows system

 Or 
traceroute <destination network name or end device address>
In UNIX and similar systems.

Route tracing utilities allow a user to determine the path or routes as well as the delay across an IP network. Several tools exist to perform this function.
The traceroute (or tracert) tool is often used for network troubleshooting. By showing a list of routers traversed, it allows the user to identify the path taken to reach a particular destination on the network or across inter networks. Each router represents a point where one network connects to another network and through which the data packet was forwarded. The number of routers is known as the number of "hops" the data traveled from source to destination.

The displayed list can help identify data flow problems when trying to access a service such as a website. It can also be useful when performing tasks such as downloading data. If there are multiple websites (mirrors) available for the same data file, one can trace each mirror to get a good idea of which mirror would be the fastest to use.

Two trace routes between the same source and destination conducted some time apart may produce different results. This is due to the "meshed" nature of the interconnected networks that comprise the Internet and the Internet Protocols ability to select different pathways over which to send packets.

Command-line-based route tracing tools are usually embedded with the operating system of the end device.

Other tools, such as VisualRoute™, are proprietary programs that provide extra information. VisualRoute uses available online information to graphically display the route.

This lab assumes the installation of VisualRoute. If the computer you are using does not have VisualRoute installed, you can download the program using the following link:

http://www.visualroute.com/download.html

Scenario

Using an Internet connection, you will use three route tracing utilities to examine the Internet pathway to destination networks. This activity should be performed on a computer that has Internet access and access to the command line. First, you will use the Windows embedded tracert utility. Second, you will use a web-based traceroute tool (http://www.subnetonline.com/pages/network-tools/online- traceroute.php). Finally, you will use the VisualRoute traceroute program.

Required Resources

1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with Internet access)

Part 1: Test Network Connectivity Using Ping

Step 1: Determine whether the remote server is reachable. To trace the route to a distant network, the PC used must have a working connection to the Internet.

  1. The first tool we will use is ping. Ping is a tool used to test whether a host is reachable. A packet of information is sent to the remote host with instructions to reply. Your local PC measures whether a response is received to each packet, and how long it takes for those packets to cross the network. The name ping comes from active sonar technology in which a pulse of sound is sent underwater and bounced off of terrain or other ships.
  2. From your PC, click the Windows Start icon, type cmd in the Search programs and files box, and then press Enter.
  3. At the command-line prompt, type ping www.cisco.com.
  4. The first output line displays the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net. This is followed by the IP address 23.1.48.170. Cisco hosts the same web content on different servers throughout the world (known as mirrors). Therefore, depending upon where you are geographically, the FQDN and the IP address will be different.
  5. From this portion of output:

Ping statistics for 23.2.128.170:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 224ms, Maximum = 234ms, Average = 227ms
Four pings were sent and a reply was received from each ping. Because each ping was responded to, there was 0% packet loss. On average, it took 227 ms (227 milliseconds) for the packets to cross the network. A millisecond is 1/1,000th of a second.
Streaming video and online games are two applications that suffer when there is packet loss, or a slow network connection. A more accurate determination of an Internet connection speed can be determined by sending 100 pings, instead of the default 4. Here is how to do that:
C:\>ping -n 100 www.cisco.com
And here is what the output from that looks like:
Ping statistics for 23.2.128.170:
Packets: Sent = 100, Received = 100, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 140ms, Maximum = 720ms, Average = 256ms

  1. Now ping Regional Internet Registry (RIR) websites located in different parts of the world:
  • For Africa:

C:\>ping www.afrinic.net
The output looks like
Pinging www.afrinic.net [196.216.2.136] with 32 bytes
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=615ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=618ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=616ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=624ms TTL=109
Ping statistics for 196.216.2.136:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 615ms, Maximum = 624ms, Average = 618ms

  • For Australia: C:\>ping www.apnic.net
    Pinging www.apnic.net [202.12.29.211] with 32 bytes of data
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=198ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=195ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=246ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=241ms TTL=52
    Ping statistics for 202.12.29.211:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 195ms, Maximum = 246ms, Average = 220ms
  • For Europe:
		C:\>ping www.ripe.net
Pinging www.ripe.net [193.0.6.139] with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 195.69.144.68: Destination net unreachable.
Request timed out.
Ping statistics for 193.0.6.139:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 1, Lost = 3 (75% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
  • For South America

C:\>ping lacnic.net
Pinging lacnic.net [200.3.14.10] with 32 bytes of data
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=613ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=613ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=620ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=817ms TTL=40
Ping statistics for 200.3.14.10:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 613ms, Maximum = 817ms, Average = 665ms
All these pings were run from a computer located in the Australia. What happens to the average ping time in milliseconds when data is traveling within the same continent (Australia) as compared to data from Australia traveling to different continents?
What is interesting about the pings that were sent to the European website?

Part 2: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Tracert

Step 1: Determine what route across the Internet traffic takes to the remote server.
Now that basic reach ability has been verified by using the ping tool, it is helpful to look more closely at each network segment that is crossed. To do this, the tracert tool will be used.

  1. At the command-line prompt, type tracert www.cisco.com.

C:\>tracert www.cisco.com
Tracing route to e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net [23.2.128.170]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4     2 ms     1 ms     2 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    53 ms     9 ms    20 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6     6 ms     2 ms     4 ms  203.215.4.204
  7   175 ms   141 ms   146 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8   161 ms   171 ms   137 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   140 ms   141 ms   140 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *      154 ms     *     po0-3-0.bdr1.sin1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.229]
 11     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 12     *        *      203 ms  pos0-7-0-1.br1.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.5]
 13   225 ms   250 ms   249 ms  20940.tyo.equinix.com [203.190.230.22]
 14   152 ms   141 ms   142 ms  a23-2-128-170.deploy.static.akamaitechnologies.com [23.2.128.170]

Trace complete.

b. Save the tracert output in a text file as follows:
1) Click alt + space this opens the tab with options like restore, minimize move down select edit, in edit select mark.
2) Select all and choose edit > copy.
3) Open the Windows Notepad program: Windows Start icon > All Programs > Accessories > Notepad.
4) Paste the output into the notepad.
5) Choose File > Save As and save the Notepad file to your desktop as tracert1.txt.
c. Run tracert for each destination website and save the output in sequentially numbered files.
C:\>ping www.afrinic.net
C:\>ping www.licnic.net
d. Interpreting tracert outputs.

Routes traced can go through many hops and a number of different Internet Service Providers (ISPs), depending on the size of your ISP and the location of the source and destination hosts. Each “hop” represents a router. A router is a specialized type of computer used to direct traffic across the Internet. Imagine taking an automobile trip across several countries using many highways. At different points in the trip you come to a fork in the road in which you have the option to select from several different highways. Now further imagine that there is a device at each fork in the road that directs you to take the correct highway to your final destination. That is what a router does for packets on a network.

Because computers talk in numbers, rather than words, routers are uniquely identified using IP addresses (numbers with the format x.x.x.x). The tracert tool shows you what path through the network a packet of information takes to reach its final destination. The tracert tool also gives you an idea of how fast traffic is going on each segment of the network. Three packets are sent to each router in the path, and the return time is measured in milliseconds. Now use this information to analyze the tracert results to www.cisco.com. Below is the entire traceroute:

C:\>tracert www.cisco.com

Tracing route to e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net [23.2.128.170] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4    69 ms   120 ms   120 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    16 ms    27 ms     3 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6    17 ms    11 ms     3 ms  203.215.4.204
  7   107 ms   181 ms   155 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8    90 ms    47 ms    61 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   140 ms   143 ms   153 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *      140 ms     *     po0-3-0.bdr1.sin1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.229]
 11     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 12     *        *      140 ms  pos0-7-0-1.br1.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.5]
 13   163 ms   147 ms   151 ms  20940.tyo.equinix.com [203.190.230.22]
 14   147 ms   143 ms   155 ms  a23-2-128-170.deploy.static.akamaitechnologies.com [23.2.128.170]

Trace complete.

Here is the breakdown Consider the first line of tracing route
1 <1 ms <1 ms <1 ms 192.168.100.13
Less than 1 milli second represents the time taken by packet to access the first router.
192.168.100.13 is the address of router on the computer home network
Consider the second line of tracing route
2 <1 ms <1 ms <1 ms dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9]
202.72.135.9 represent hop 2 POP router.
In the example output shown above, the tracert packets travel from the source PC to the local router default gateway (hop 1: 192.168.100.13) to the ISPs Point of Presence (POP) router (hop 2: 202.72.135.9). Every ISP has numerous POP routers. These POP routers are at the edge of the ISP’s network and are the means by which customers connect to the Internet. The packets travel along westnet network for two hops and then jump to a router that belongs to ii.net. This could mean that the packets have traveled to another ISP. This is significant because sometimes there is packet loss in the transition between ISPs, or sometimes one ISP is slower than another.

e. There is an Internet tool known as whois. The whois tool allows us to determine who owns a domain name. A web-based whois tool is found at http://whois.domaintools.com/.

To summarize, Internet traffic starts at a home PC and travels through the home router (hop 1). It then connects to the ISP and travels through its network (hops 2-7) until it arrives at the remote server (hop 8).This is a relatively unusual example in which there is only one ISP involved from start to finish. It is typical to have two or more ISP involved as displayed in the following examples.

f. Now examine an example that involves Internet traffic crossing multiple ISPs. Below is the tracert for www.afrinic.net:

C:\Users>tracert www.afrinic.net

Tracing route to www.afrinic.net [196.216.2.136] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4   132 ms    58 ms    46 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5 ]
  5     3 ms     3 ms     2 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210 ]
  6     2 ms     1 ms     2 ms  203.215.4.204
  7     4 ms     5 ms     1 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8     2 ms     3 ms     3 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   314 ms   313 ms   314 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 11   288 ms   295 ms   286 ms  gi0-0-5.bdr1.lon1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.101]
 12   290 ms     *      287 ms  te0-3-1-0.core1b-dock.isnet.net [195.66.224.198]
 13   526 ms   504 ms   486 ms  core1b-pkl-pos-0-0-5-0.ip.isnet.net [168.209.201 .62]
 14   481 ms   483 ms   487 ms  csw4-pkl-gi1-1.ip.isnet.net [196.26.0.101]
 15   457 ms   457 ms   460 ms  196.37.155.180
 16     *      519 ms   487 ms  fa1-0-1.ar02.jnb.afrinic.net [196.216.3.132]
 17   556 ms   458 ms   458 ms  196.216.2.136

Trace complete.

Question.What happens at hop 7? Is ii.net the same ISP as hops 2-6, or a different ISP? Use the whois tool to answer this question.

Question.What happens in hop 9 to the amount of time it takes for a packet to travel between hop 8 – 9, as compared with earlier hops.

Question.What happens in hop 15? Do a whois lookup on 196.37.155.180 using the whois tool. Who owns this network?

g. Type tracert www.lacnic.net.

C:\Users>tracert lacnic.net

Tracing route to lacnic.net [200.3.14.10] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4    14 ms     5 ms     5 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    32 ms    27 ms     4 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6     4 ms     3 ms     *     203.215.4.206
  7     2 ms     4 ms     *     ae6-10.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.92]
  8    38 ms    35 ms    39 ms  ae1.cr1.adl6.on.ii.net [150.101.33.36]
  9   300 ms   296 ms     *     ae4.br1.syd7.on.ii.net [150.101.33.34]
 10    86 ms    66 ms    92 ms  ae0.br1.syd4.on.ii.net [150.101.33.14]
 11   291 ms   288 ms     *     te0-1-1-2.br2.lax1.on.ii.net [203.16.213.190]
 12   315 ms   288 ms   295 ms  te0-1-0.bdr1.iad1.on.ii.net [203.16.213.186]
 13   405 ms   267 ms   261 ms  xe-2-0-0-0.border-a.ash.ctbc.com.br [206.126.236 .205]
 14   486 ms   488 ms   488 ms  xe-1-3-2-0.core-a.ula001.ctbc.com.br [201.48.45.210]
 15   431 ms   436 ms   435 ms  et-5-0-0-0.core-b.ula001.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.6]
 16   486 ms     *      486 ms  ae3-0.core-b.spo511.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.14]
 17   523 ms   485 ms   483 ms  xe-0-1-0-0.edge-c.spo511.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.93]
 18   450 ms   446 ms   442 ms  xe-0-0-2.537.gw1.nu.registro.br [187.32.53.69]
 19   473 ms   521 ms   471 ms  xe-5-0-1-0.core1.nu.registro.br [200.160.0.166]
 20   464 ms   456 ms   453 ms  ae0-0.ar3.nu.registro.br [200.160.0.249]
 21   483 ms   486 ms   495 ms  gw01.lacnic.registro.br [200.160.0.212]
 22   480 ms   472 ms   548 ms  200.3.12.36
 23   533 ms   627 ms   578 ms  www.lacnic.net [200.3.14.10]

Trace complete.

Question. What happens in hop 7?

Part 3: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Web-Based and Software Tools

The web based and software tools are gives graphical representation of tool which are not accessible and cannot be accessed using NVDA.

1.4.4.3 Lab - Researching IT and Network Job opportunities

The diagrams associated with this lab are described within the lab text.

1.5.1.1 Class Activity - Draw Your Concept of the Internet Now

Accessibility modification:
This activity follows on from Activity 1.0.1.2.
Based on what you have learned in Chapter 1 rewrite your description of what you thought a home or a school network topology was. Be prepared to discuss and explain your revised concept of networks and the Internet.

Chapter 2: Configuring a network operating system

2.0.1.2 Class Activity - It is Just an Operating System

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

2.1.4.9 Lab - Establishing a Console session with Tera Term

The topology is a switch connected with a console cable to a PC.
Step 2 d. The diagram referred to is a terminal screen showing typical Switch startup output.
Part 3: (Optional) Access a Cisco Router Using a Mini-USB Console Cable
The topology is a router connected with a console cable to a PC.

2.3.3.4 Lab – Building a Simple Network

The topology is two switches and two PCs.
PC-A is connected with a straight-through Ethernet cable to interface F0/6 of switch S1.
Interface F0/1 of SW-1 is connected with a crossover Ethernet cable to Interface F0/1 of SW-2.
Interface F0/18 of SW-2 is connected with a straight-through Ethernet cable to PC-B.

2.3.3.5 Lab - Configuring a Switch Management Address

The topology is a switch and a PC. Interface F0/6 of the switch is connected with an Ethernet cable to the PC.
Step 2 a. The figure is command line output showing successful pings
Step 2 b. The figure is command line output showing successful pings
Step 3 a. The figure is command line output showing the text:
Unauthorized access is strictly prohibited.
User Access Verification.
Password:

Chapter 3: Network Protocols and Communications

3.0.1.2 Class Activity - Let's just talk about this...

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.
Accessibility modification:
A PC or laptop computer can be substituted for the automobile example if thought to be more relevant.

3.2.3.6 Lab - Researching Networking Standards

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this lab.

3.2.4.7 Lab - Researching RFCs

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this lab.

3.3.3.4 Lab - Using Wireshark to View Network Traffic

This lab is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

3.4.1.1 Class Activity - Guaranteed to Work Instructor

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

Chapter 4: Network Access

4.0.1.2 Class Activity - Let Me Tell You What I Heard at a Conference (Managing the Medium)

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

4.1.2.4 Lab - Identifying Network Devices and Cabling

This lab is not accessible in an online environment.

4.2.2.7 Lab - Building an Ethernet Crossover Cable

This lab is not accessible.

4.2.4.6 Lab - Viewing Wired and Wireless NIC Information

The diagrams associated with this lab are described within the lab text.

4.5.1.1 Class Activity - Linked In!

This lab includes the floor plan of a small business that’s shows eleven offices and meeting rooms.
Accessibility modification:
Instead of drawing the cabling detail on the floor plan describe the cabling specifications for typical business premises with eleven offices and meeting rooms. Include the number of data points that you would install in each office and room and the number of cable runs required. Consider any technical specifications that you think should apply to physical data cabling.

Chapter 5: Ethernet

5.0.1.2 Activity - Join My Social Circle!

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

5.1.3.6 Lab - Viewing Network Device MAC Addresses

The topology is one router labelled R1, one switch labelled S1, and one PC labelled PC-A.
Interface G0/1 of R1 is connected to interface F0/5 of switch S1.
Interface F0/6 of S1 is connected to PC-A.

5.1.4.3 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine Ethernet Frames

This lab is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

5.2.1.8 Lab - Observing ARP with the Windows CLI, IOS CLI, and Wireshark

The topology is one router labelled R1, two switches labelled S1 and S2, and two PCs labelled PC-A and PC-B.
Interface G0/1 of R1 is connected to interface F0/5 of switch S1.
Interface F0/6 of S1 is connected to PC-A.
Interface F0/1 of S1 is connected to interface F0/1 of switch S2.
Interface F0/1 of S2 is connected to PC-B.
Part 4. This part is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

5.3.1.10 Lab - Using IOS CLI to View the Switch MAC Address Table

The topology is one router labelled R1, two switches labelled S1 and S2, and two PCs labelled PC-A and PC-B.
Interface G0/1 of R1 is connected to interface F0/5 of switch S1.
Interface F0/6 of S1 is connected to PC-A.
Interface F0/1 of S1 is connected to interface F0/1 of switch S2.
Interface F0/1 of S2 is connected to PC-B.

5.4.1.1 Class Activity - MAC and Choose … Explain basic switching concepts.

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

Chapter 6: Network Layer

6.0.1.2 Class Activity - The Road Less Traveled

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

6.2.2.8 Lab - View Host Routing Tables

The topology is a cloud icon connected to a router labelled Default Gateway. The router is connected to a PC.

6.3.1.9 Lab - Exploring Router Physical Characteristics

The topology is a router connected with a console cable to a PC.
Part 1: Step 1: Identify the various parts of a Cisco router.
This step is not accessible. An accessibility modification could be to handle a Cisco router and note the physical shape of each interface.
Part 1: Step 2: Examine the router activity and status lights.
This step is not accessible.
Part 2: Examine Router Internal Characteristics Using Show Commands
This part of the lab is accessible.

6.4.3.5 Lab - Building a Switch and Router Network

The topology is one router labelled R1, one switch labelled S1, and two PCs, one labelled PC-A, and one labelled PC-B.
Interface G0/1 of R1 is connected to interface F0/5 of switch S1.
Interface F0/6 of S1 is connected to PC-A.
Interface G0/0 of R1 is connected to PC-B.
Appendix A: Configuration Details for Steps in Part 2
Step 1: Configure the PC interfaces, sub-step c “Ping PC-B from a command prompt window on PC-A.”
The graphic shows unsuccessful pings with the message “Destination host unreachable”.

6.5.1.1 Class Activity - Can You Read This Map?

This activity is based on using Cisco Packet Tracer which is inaccessible.
Accessibility modification:
Using the following output from the command “show ip route”, describe the network associated with this router.

Router# show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP

       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
       i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area
       * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
       P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is not set

192.168.0.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.0.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0 L 192.168.0.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0 192.168.1.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks C 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1 L 192.168.1.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
Router#

Chapter 7: Transport Layer

7.0.1.2 Class Activity - We Need to Talk - Game

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.

7.2.1.8 Lab - Using Wireshark to Observe the TCP 3-Way Handshake

This lab is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

7.2.3.5 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine a UDP DNS Capture

This lab is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

7.2.4.3 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine FTP and TFTP Captures

This lab is currently not accessible. It will be rewritten to reference T-Shark instead of WireShark.

7.3.1.1 Class Activity - We Need to Talk, Again - Game

There are no topologies or diagrams associated with this activity.


Chapter 8: IP Addressing


Chapter 9: Subnetting IP Networks


Chapter 10: Application Layer


Chapter 11: It’s a Network


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