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Chapter 7 - Laptops

7.0 Laptops

7.0.1 Introduction >7.0.1.1 Introduction

The figure on this page shows the following 5 images:

  • A student sitting in a park using a laptop
  • A technician using a laptop during equipment maintenance
  • A lady using a laptop in a cafe
  • A man using a laptop while sitting in a train
  • A medical professional sitting at a table with a laptop

7.1 Laptop Components

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.1 External Features Unique to Laptops

Figure 1 on this page shows an image of a laptop screen with the following three LEDs highlighted at the top of the screen:

LED Description
Bluetooth The Bluetooth status LED indicates when the Bluetooth wireless transceiver is enabled. Bluetooth is a wireless industry standard that enables portable devices to communicate over short distances.
Battery Status The battery status LED indicates the status of the battery. A laptop computer can use a battery or an AC power adapter to operate. The type of battery and how the laptop is used affects how long a battery charge will last.
Standby The Standby LED indicates whether the laptop is in standby or not. Standby mode reduces the amount of electricity used by the laptop by shutting off the monitor, hard drive, and CPU. A small amount of electricity is used to keep the RAM active and to make the data available. A laptop computer may enter standby mode when it has not.

Figure 2 on this page shows an image of the rear view of a laptop with the following components highlighted:

  • Battery Bay: A connector that is used to attach a laptop battery.
  • AC Power Connector: A connector that is used to attach the AC power adapter to the laptop and to charge the battery.
  • Parallel Port: A socket that is used to connect a device such as a printer or scanner.

Figure 3 on this page shows the following table comparing different Laptop batteries:

Type of Battery Characteristics Common Use
Nickel-cadmium “Ni-Cad” (NiCd) Heavy for the power it holds, long life (many charging cycles), may exhibit memory effect Toys, Cordless phones, emergency lighting, power tools, camera flash
Nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH) Moderate weight for power, moderate lifespan, may experience “polarity reversal” at end of cycle, shut down or recharge at once. May need several charge/discharge cycles to reach full capability Cell phones, digital cameras, GPS units, flashlights, and other consumer electronics
Lithium-ion (Li-Ion) Light weight for power, no memory effect, can easily overheat, keep cool, charge often, seek freshest batteries (most recently manufactured) Cell phone, laptops
Lithium-polymer (Li-Poly or LiPo) Costly, small, lightweight for power, moderate capacity, fast recharge, moderate life span, do not short circuit is not flammable PDAs, laptop computers, portable MP3 players, portable gaming devices, radio controlled airplanes

Figure 4 on this page shows an image of the left side view of a laptop with the following components highlighted:

  • Security Keyhole: A hard point in the laptop frame that is used to attach a security cable.
  • USB Port: A socket that is used to connect one or more peripherals.
  • S-video OPort: A four-pin mini-DIN connector that is used to output video signals to a compatible device. S-video separates the brightness and color portions of a video signal.
  • RJ-11 Modem Port: A device that is used to connect the laptop to a standard telephone line. The modem can be used to connect the computer to the Internet, to fax documents, and to answer incoming calls.
  • Ethernet Port: An RJ-45 socket that is used to connect the laptop to a cabled local area network.
  • Network Status LEDs: The two network LEDs are lights that indicate the status of the network connection. The green link light indicates network connectivity. The other LED light indicates the traffic to and from the laptop.
  • Headphone Jack: A socket that is used to output audio signals to connected stereo headphones or speakers.
  • Microphone Jack: A socket that is used to connect a microphone used for audio input.
  • Ventillation Grill: A series of vents that allow hot air to be expelled from the interior of the laptop.
  • PC Combination Card Slot: An expansion slot that supports the ExpressCard expansion cards in the top slot and PC Cards in the bottom slot.

Figure 5 on this page shows an image of the front view of a laptop with the following components highlighted:

  • Infrared Port: A line-of-sight wireless transceiver that is used for data transmission.
  • Speakers: An output device which converts audio signals produced within the laptop to sound.
  • Laptop Latch: A lever that is used to open the laptop lid.
  • Ventilation Grill: A series of vents which allows hot air to be expelled from the interior of a laptop.

Figure 6 on this page shows an image of the right side view of a laptop with the following components highlighted:

  • Optical drive: A disk drive which is used to read and write to optical media.
  • Optical drive activity indicator: An LED that illuminates when the drive is in use.
  • Drive bay status indicator: An LED that is illuminated when a drive is installed in the laptop bay.
  • VGA port: A 15-pin socket which connects to external display and projectors.

Figure 7 on this page shows an image of the bottom view of a laptop with the following components highlighted:

  • Hard Drive Access Panel: A cover that provides access to the internal hard drive bay.
  • RAM Access Panel: A cover which provides access to the expansion memory.
  • Docking Connector: A socket that is used to attach a laptop to a docking station.
  • Two Battery Latches: Levers that are used when inserting, removing or securing a laptop battery.

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.2 Common Input Devices and LEDs in Laptops

Image 1 on this page shows the components when a laptop is open. These are:

  • Keyboard: A compact input device which has multi-functional keys.
  • Touchpad: Consists of right and left click buttons and a pointer controller. The touchpad and pointer controller can be used instead of a mouse for a laptop.
  • Fingerprint Reader: An input device used for security authentication.
  • Volume Controls: Buttons that control audio output.
  • Power Button: A control that turns the laptop on or off.

Image 2 on this page shows the following LEDs located at the bottom of a laptop scree:

  • Wireless: Indicates the activity of the wireless network connection.
  • Bluetooth: Indicates when the Bluetooth wireless transceiver is enabled.
  • Num lock: Indicates the on/off status of the 10-key number pad.
  • Caps lock: Indicates the on/off status of the caps lock.
  • Hard drive activity: Indicates the activity of the hard drive.
  • Power: Indicates the on/off status of the laptop.
  • Battery status: Indicates the status of the laptop battery.
  • Hibernation or Standby: Indicates whether the computer is in standby mode or if it is entering or leaving hibernate mode.

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.3 Internal Components

Figure 1 on this page shows an image of a desktop motherboard and an image of a laptop motherboard.

Figure 2 on this page shows the following table comparing desktop and Laptop design:

ComponentLaptopDesktop
Motherboard form factorProprietaryAT,LPX,NLX,ATX,BTX
Expansion SlotMini-PCIPCI, PCIe, ISA, AGP
RAM slot typeSODIMMSIMM,DIMM,RIMM

Figure 3 on this page shows an image of a Small Outline Dual In-line Memory Module (SODIMM).

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.4 Special Function Keys

The figure on this page shows a person pressing the Fn key and the F7 key to switch between the desktop monitor screen and the laptop monitor screen.

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.5 Docking Station versus Port Replicator

Image 1 on this page shows an image of the top view of a docking station with the following components highlighted:

  • Docking Connector: a socket that is used to attach a laptop to a docking station
  • Power Button: A control that turns the power on off to the laptop when the laptop is connected to the docking station.
  • Eject Button: A lever that releases the laptop from the docking station so that the laptop can be removed.

Image 2 on this page shows an image of the rear view of a docking station with the following components highlighted:

  • Exhaust Vent: An outlet that expels hot air from the interior of a docking station.
  • AC Power Connector: A socket that is used to connect the AC power adapter to the docking station.
  • PC Combination Card Slot: An expansion slot that supports the Express Card expansion cards in the top slot and PC cards in the bottom slot.
  • Ethernet Port: An RJ-45 socket that is used to connect a laptop to a cabled local area network.
  • RJ-11 Modem Port: A device that is used to connect a laptop to a standard telephone line.
  • Serial Port: A socket that is used to connect a device such as mouse or trackball.
  • VGA Port: A 15-pin socket that connects to an external display and projectors.
  • Parallel Port: A socket that is used to connect a device such as a printer or scanner.
  • DVI Port: A socket that is used to attach a digital video monitor.
  • External-Diskette-Drive Connector: A socket that is used to connect an external disk drive.
  • Headphone Connector: A socket that is used to attach an audio output device.
  • Line in Connector: A socket that is used to attach an audio source.
  • Universal Serial Bus Port (USB): A socket that is used to connect one or more peripherals.
  • Keyboard Port: A PS/2 socket that is used to attach an external keyboard.
  • Mouse Port: A PS/2 socket that is used to attach an external mouse.

Image 3 on this page shows an image of the right side view of a docking station highlighting the Key Lock which is a socket into which a key is inserted to lock the laptop to the docking station.

7.1.1 Laptop Components >7.1.1.6: Worksheet - Research Docking Stations

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.2 Laptop Display Components

7.2.1 Comparing Display Types >7.2.1.1 LCD, LED, OLED, and Plasma Monitors

The image on this page shows a man sitting at a desk with two desktop monitors, a laptop computer, a phone and a drawing tablet.

7.2.2 Internal Components >7.2.2.1 Backlights and Inverters

Image 1 on this page shows an inverter which is a small strip of circuit board which powers a backlight for computer monitor screens or laptop monitor screens. See page notes for full description.

Image 2 on this page shows a backlight which is a thin long tube with a small connector on the end that plugs into the inverter. See page notes for full description.

7.2.2 Internal Components >7.2.2.2 Wi-Fi Antenna Connectors

Image 1 on this page shows a laptop screen with the surrounds removed. The Wi-Fi antennas are located above the screen.

Image 2 on this page shows the Wi-Fi antenna leads connected to a wireless card.

Image 3 on this page shows a laptop screen with the surrounds removed. The Wi-Fi antenna wire guides are located around the screen.

7.3 Laptop Power

7.3.1 Power Settings >7.3.1.1 Power Management

Figure 1 on this page shows the following table listing different standards for advanced configuration and power interface (ACPI).

Standard Description
S0 The computer is on and the CPU is running.
S1 The CPU and RAM are still receiving power, but unused devices are powered down.
S2 The CPU is off, but the RAM is refreshed. The system is in a lower mode than S1.
S3 The CPU is off, and the RAM is set to a slow refresh rate. This mode is often called "Save to RAM". In Windows XP, this state is known as the suspend mode.
S4 The CPU and RAM are off. The contents of RAM have been saved to a temporary file on the hard disk. This mode is also called "saved to disk". In windows 7, Windows Vista and Windows XP, this state is known as hibernation mode.
S5 The computer is off.

7.3.1 Power Management >7.3.1.2 Managing ACPI Settings in the BIOS

The image on this page shows Power tab of the BIOS Setup Utility. The Power tab has the following two options available:

  • Power management/APM
  • ACPI Aware OS

7.3.1 Power Management >7.3.1.3: Worksheet - Match ACPI Standards

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.3.1 Power Management >7.3.1.4 Managing Laptop Power Options

Image 1 on this page shows the Windows 7 Power Options utility running on a laptop. The following options can be set for when the laptop is running on battery and when it is plugged in:

  • When I press the power button
  • When I press the sleep button
  • When I close the lid

Image 2 on this page shows the Windows 7 Power Options Advanced Settings utility running on a laptop. The available options are:

  • Power saver
  • Hard disk
  • Internet Explorer
  • Desktop background settings
  • Wireless Adapter Settings
  • Sleep
  • USB settings
  • Power buttons and lid
  • PCI Express
  • Processor power management
  • Display
  • Multimedia settings

Image 3 on this page shows the Windows 7 Edit Plan Settings utility running on a laptop. The following options can be set for when the laptop is running on battery and when it is plugged in:

  • Dim the Display
  • Turn off the Display
  • Put the Computer to Sleep
  • Adjust Plan Brightness

Image 4 on this page shows Windows XP Power Schemes tab of the Power Options Properties utility running on a laptop. The following options can be set for when the laptop is plugged in or running on batteries:

  • Turn off Monitor
  • Turn off Hard disk
  • System Standby
  • System Hibernates

7.4 Laptop Wireless Communication Technologies

7.4.1 Features and OS Configuration >7.4.1.1 Bluetooth

Figure 1 on this page shows the following table listing Bluetooth characteristics:

A short range wireless technology designed to eliminate the need for cables between portable or fixed-configuration devices
Operates at 2.4 to 2.485 GHz in the unlicensed industrial, Scientific, and Medical band
Low power, low cost, and small size
Uses adaptive frequency hopping
Version 1.2 operates up to 1.2 Mbps
Version 2.0 + Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) operates at up to 3Mbps
Version 3.0 + High Speed (HS) operates at up to 24 Mbps

Figure 2 on this page shows the following table listing Bluetooth Classifications:

ClassMaximum permitted power mWApproximate Distance
Class 1100 mW~330 feet (100 meters)
Class 22.5 mW~33 feet (10 meters)
Class 31 mW~3 feet (1 meter)

Figure 3 on this page shows the following table listing Bluetooth Specifications:

SpecificationVersionData transfer Rate
1.0V1.21 Mb/s
2.0V2.0 + EDR3 Mb/s
3.0V3.0 + HS24 Mb/s
4.0V4.0 + LE24 Mb/s

7.4.1 Features and OS Configuration >7.4.1.2 Infrared

Figure 1 on this page shows the following table listing common infrared characteristics:

Infrared (IR) wireless technology is low-power, short range wireless technology that uses LEDs.
Infrared light signals operate in the lowest light frequency and transmission distances are limited to a few feet or meters.
Infrared light cannot penetrate ceilings or walls.

Figure 2 on this page is an image of an infrared port transceiver on a laptop.

7.4.1 Features and OS Configuration >7.4.1.3 Cellular WAN

Image 1 on this page shows a WAN card which has LEDS to show the status and functionality of the card when plugged into a laptop.

Image 2 on this page shows a Wi-Fi mobile hotspot. The Wi-Fi hotspot allows any of your mobile devices to connect to the hotspot and share one internet connection. The Wi-Fi hotspot can also act as the router and wireless access point.

7.4.1 Features and OS Configuration >7.4.1.4 Wi-Fi

The image on this page shows the following three wireless adapter types which are used in laptops:

  • Mini-PCI
  • Mini-PCIe
  • PCI Express Micro

7.5 Laptop Hardware and Component Installation and Configuration

7.5.1 Expansion Options >7.5.1.1 Expansion Cards

Figure 1 on this page shows the following two tables comparing PC Bus and Express Bus laptop expansion cards:

PC BUS Size Thickness Interface Examples
Type 1 85.6 mm x 54 mm 3.3 mm Memory, IO, CardBus SRAM, Flash
Type 2 85.6 mm x 54 mm 5 mm Memory, IO, CardBus Modem, LAN, Wireless
Type 3 85.6 mm x 54 mm 10.5 mm Memory, IO, CardBus Hard Drive
Express Bus Size Thickness Interface Examples
Express card/34 75 mm x 34 mm 5 mm PCI Express or USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 Firewire, TV, Tuner, Wireless NIC
Express card/54 75 mm x 54 mm 5 mm PCI Express or USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 Smart Card Reader, Compact flash reader, 1.8-inch disk drive

Figure 2 on this page shows images of the following three different laptop expansion cards with their dimensions:

CardLength (mm)Width (mm)
PC Card85.654
PC Express Card/5475 with a 22mm square cut out at the top right corner54
PC Express Card/347534

7.5.1 Expansion Options >7.5.1.2 Flash Memory

Image 1 on this page shows a USB flash drive with an attached cover that swivels to either side to reveal the USB connector.

Image 2 on this page shows a 4Gb SD flash card and a 4Gb SDHC flash card.

Image 3 on this page shows a picture of a laptop with an SD flash card reader built into the side of the laptop which can accept various size SD flash cards.

7.5.1 Expansion Options >7.5.1.3 SODIMM Memory

Image 1 on this page shows a SODIMM memory card installed in a laptrop.

Image 2 on this page shows the Windows 7 System utility which lists the following information:

  • Windows edition
  • Processor
  • Installed memory (RAM)
  • System type (32 bit or 64 bit)
  • Pen and touch
  • Computer name
  • Computer description

7.5.1 Expansion Options >7.5.1.4: Worksheet - Laptop RAM

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.1 Overview of Hardware Replacement

Image 1 on this page shows an LCD laptop screen with the surrounding moulding removed.

Image 2 on this page shows a computer technician using a specialised tool to remove the keyboard from a laptop computer.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.2 Power

Image 1 on this page shows a person removing a laptop battery.

Image 2 on this page shows a replaceable laptop DC jack which is connected to a laptop motherboard by a 5 pin connector.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.3: Worksheet - Laptop Batteries

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.4 Keyboard, Touchpad, and Screen

Image 1 on this page shows a laptop case for an IBM laptop computer with the middle section hollow to allow the keyboard to fit into the case.

Image 2 on this page shows a laptop case for an IBM computer with the touch pad attached to the plastic case. It also shows the connector cable and the corresponding socket on the motherboard.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.5: Worksheet - Laptop Screens

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.6 Hard Drive and Optical Drive

Image 1 on this page shows a laptop hard drive which is being inserted into the right hand side of the laptop to replace the old hard drive.

Image 2 on this page shows an optical drive that is being inserted on the right hand side of the laptop to replace the old optical drive.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.7: Worksheet - Laptop Hard Drives

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.8 Wireless Card

The image on this page shows an IT technician removing a PCI express Mini wireless card from a laptop.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.9 Speakers

The image on this page shows a set of laptop speakers sitting on top of a laptop computer which has had the track pad and keyboard section removed showing the laptop motherboard.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.10 CPU

The image on this page shows a computer technician undoing the screw that holds the laptop CPU in the place.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.11 System Board

The image on this page shows a Dell laptop motherboard.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.12 Plastics

The image on this page shows a picture of a laptop case for an IBM computer with the touch pad attached and the middle section hollow to allow the keyboard to fit into the case.

7.5.2 Replacing Hardware Devices >7.5.2.13: Worksheet - Build a Specialised Laptop

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.6 Preventive Maintenance Techniques for Laptops

7.6.1 Scheduled Maintenance for Laptops >7.6.1.1 Scheduling Maintenance

The image on this page shows 2 laptops. One on a desk with a mug spilling water all over the laptop keyboard and the second laptop hanging over the edge of a workbench.

7.6.1 Scheduled Maintenance for Laptops >7.6.1.2 Cleaning Procedures

The image on this page shows a laptop, a can of compressed air, a PC toolkit that includes a DVD drive cleaning disc, lint free cloth, LCD cleaning solution and other computer cleaning materials and maintenance tools.

7.7 Basic Troubleshooting Process for Laptops

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.1 Identify the Problem

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the first step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 1: Identify the Problem
Open-Ended Questions.
  • What problems are you experiencing with your laptop?
  • What software has been installed recently?
  • What were you doing when the problem was identified?
  • What error messages have you received?
Close-ended Questions
  • Is the laptop under warranty?
  • Is the laptop currently using the battery?
  • Can the laptop operate using the AC adaptor?
  • Can the laptop boot and show the operating system desktop?

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.2 Establish a Theory of Probable Cause

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the second step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 2: Establish a Theory of Probable Cause
Common causes of laptop problems.
  • Battery does not have a charge
  • Battery will not charge
  • Loose cable connections
  • Keyboard does not work
  • Num Lock key is on
  • Loose RAM

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.3 Test the Theory to Determine Cause

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the third step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 3: Test the Theory to Determine Cause
Common steps to determine cause.
  • Use AC adapter with laptop
  • Replace battery
  • Reboot the laptop
  • Check BIOS settings
  • Disconnect and reconnect the cables
  • Disconnect peripherals
  • Toggle Num Lock key
  • Remove and reinstall RAM
  • Caps lock key is on
  • check for non-bootable media in a boot device

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.4 Establish a Plan of Action to Resolve the Problem and Implement the Solution

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the fourth step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 4: Establish a Plan of Action to Resolve the Problem and Implement the Solution
If no solution is achieved in the previous step, further research is needed to implement the solution.
  • Helpdesk Repair Logs
  • Other technicians
  • Manufacturer FAQs
  • Technical websites
  • Newsgroups
  • Computer Manuals
  • Device Manuals
  • Online Forums
  • Internet Search

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.5 Verify Full System Functionality and Implement Preventative Measures

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the fifth step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 5: Verify Full System Functionality and Implement Preventative Measures
Verify Solution and Full System Functionality.
  • Reboot the laptop
  • Attach all peripherals
  • Operate laptop using only battery
  • Print a document from an application
  • Type sample document to test keyboard
  • Check event viewer for warnings or errors

7.7.1 Applying the Troubleshooting Process to Laptops >7.7.1.6 Document Findings, Actions, and Outcomes

The figure on this page shows the following table listing the sixth step in troubleshooting laptop problems:

Step 6: Document Findings, Actions, and Outcomes
Document your findings, actions, and outcomes.
  • Discuss the solution implemented with the customer
  • Have the customer verify the problem has been solved
  • Provide the customer with all paperwork
  • Document the steps taken to solve the problem in the work order and the technician’s journal
  • Document any components used in the repair
  • Document the time spend to resolve the problem

7.7.2 Common Problems and Solutions for Laptops >7.7.2.1 Identify Common Problems and Solutions

The figure on this page shows the following table listing common laptop problems and solutions:

Identify the Problem Probable Cause Possible Solutions
Laptop does not power on
  • Laptop is not plugged in
  • Battery is not charged
  • Battery will not hold a charge
  • Plug the laptop into AC power
  • Remove and reinstall the battery
  • Replace battery if it will not charge
Laptop battery supports the system for a reduced period of time
  • Proper battery charging and discharging practices have not been followed
  • Extra peripherals are draining the battery
  • Power plan isn't configured correctly
  • Battery is not holding a charge for very long
  • Follow the battery charging procedures described in your manual
  • Remove unneeded peripherals and disable wireless NIC if possible
  • Modify power plan to decrease battery usage
  • Replace battery
External display has power but no image on the screen
  • Video cable is loose or damaged
  • The laptop is not sending a video signal to the external display
  • Reconnect or replace video cable
  • Use the Fn key along with the multi-purpose key to toggle to the external display
Laptop is powered on, but nothing is displayed on the LCD screen when the laptop lid is reopened
  • LCD cut off switch is dirty or damaged
  • The laptop has gone into sleep mode
  • Check the laptop repair manual for instructions about cleaning or replacing the LCD cut off switch
  • Press a key on the keyboard to bring the computer out of sleep mode
The image on a laptop screen looks dull and pale

The LCD backlight is not properly adjusted

Check the laptop repair manual for instructions about calibrating the LCD backlight
The image on a laptop display is pixilated LCD display properties are incorrect Set the LCD screen to native resolution
The laptop display is flickering
  • Images on the screen are not refreshing fast enough
  • The display inverter is damaged or malfunctioning
  • Adjust the screen refresh rate
  • Disassemble the display unit and replace the inverter
A user is experiencing a ghost cursor that moves on its own
  • The track pad is dirty
  • A track pad and mouse are being used at the same time
  • A part of the hand has touched the track pad while typing
  • Clean the track pad
  • Disconnect the mouse
  • Try not to touch the track pad while typing
Pixels on the screen are dead, or not generating colour Power to the pixels has been cut off Contact the manufacturer
The image on the screen appears to flash lines or patterns of different colour and size (artifacts)
  • The display is not properly connected
  • The GPU is overheating
  • The GPU is faulty or malfunctioning
  • Disassemble the laptop to check the display connections
  • Disassemble and clean the computer
  • checking for dust and debris
  • Replace the GPU
Colour patterns on a screen are incorrect
  • The display is not properly connected
  • The GPU is overheating
  • The GPU is faulty or malfunctioning
  • Disassemble the laptop to check the display connections
  • Disassemble and clean the computer
  • checking for dust and debris
  • Replace the GPU
Images on a display screen are distorted
  • Display settings have been changed
  • The display is not properly connected
  • The GPU is overheating
  • The GPU is faulty or malfunctioning
  • Restore display settings to the original factory settings
  • Disassemble the computer to a point where you can check display connections
  • Disassemble and clean the computer
  • checking for dust and debris
  • Replace the GPU
The network is fully functional and the wireless laptop connection is enabled, but the laptop cannot connect to the network
  • Laptop wireless capability is turned off
  • External wireless antenna is misaligned
  • Out of wireless range
  • Turn laptop wireless on using the wireless NIC properties or the Fn key along with the appropriate multi-purpose key
  • Realign external wireless antenna to pick up wireless signal
  • Move closer to the wireless access point
Input devices connected with Bluetooth are not functioning properly
  • Bluetooth capability is turned off
  • Batteries in the input device are not providing power
  • The input device is out of range
  • Turn laptop Bluetooth on in by using the Bluetooth settings applet or the Fn key along with the appropriate multi-purpose key
  • Replace the batteries
  • Move the input device closer to the laptop's Bluetooth receiver
  • Verify that the laptop Bluetooth is turned on
Keyboard is inserting numbers instead of text and num lock indicator light is on Num lock is enabled Turn num lock off using the Num Lock key or an Fn key along with the appropriate multi-purpose key

7.7.2 Common Problems and Solutions for Laptops >7.7.2.2: Worksheet - Research Laptop Problems

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.7.2 Common Problems and Solutions for Laptops >7.7.2.3: Worksheet - Gather Information from the Customer

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.7.2 Common Problems and Solutions for Laptops >7.7.2.4: Worksheet - Investigating Support Websites and Repair Companies

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files

7.8 Laptops

7.8.1 Summary >7.8.1.1 Summary

The figure on this page shows the following 5 images:

  • A student sitting in a park using a laptop
  • A technician using a laptop during equipment maintenance
  • A lady using a laptop in a cafe
  • A man using a laptop while sitting in a train
  • A medical professional sitting at a table with a laptop

End of Chapter 7: Laptops.

Next - Chapter 8: Mobile Devices.

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Page last modified on March 26, 2015, at 01:56 AM