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IntroductionToNetworksLabWork

Chapter 1: Exploring the network

1.1.1.8: Lab Researching Network Collaboration Tools

Objectives:

This lab module is divided into four parts .The objective of four parts are
Part 1: Use Collaboration Tools

  • Identify current awareness of collaboration tools.
  • Identify key reasons for using collaboration tools.

Part 2: Share Documents with Google Drive
Part 3: Explore Conferencing and Web Meetings
Part 4: Create Wiki Pages

Background / Scenario:

Network collaboration tools give people the opportunity to work together efficiently and productively without the constraints of location or time zone. Collaborative tool types include document sharing, web meetings, and wikis.
In Part 1, you will identify collaboration tools that you currently use. You will also research some popular collaborative tools used today. In Part 2, you will work with Google Drive. In Part 3, you will investigate Conferencing and Web meeting tools and, in Part 4, you will work with wikis.

Required resources:

Resource required for this lab is device with internet access.

PART 1: Use collaboration tools

Step 1: List some collaboration tools that you currently use today
Step 2: List some reasons for using collaboration tools.
Part 2: Share Documents with Google Drive

In Part 2, you will explore the document sharing functions by using Google Drive to set up document sharing. Google Drive, formally Google Docs, is a web-based office suite and data storage service that allows users to create and edit documents online while collaborating in real-time with other users. Google Drive provides 5 GB of storage with every free Google account. You can purchase additional storage, if needed.

Step 1: Create a Google account. To use any of Google’s services, you must first create a Google account. This account can be used with any of Google’s services, including Gmail.

  1. Browse to www.google.com and click Sign in (located at the top-right corner of the web page).
  2. On the Google Accounts web page, if you already have a Google account, you can sign in now; otherwise, click SIGN UP.(located on top – right corner of the Google account page)
  3. On the Create a new Google Account web page, fill out the form to the right. The name you enter in the Choose your username field becomes the account name. It is not necessary to supply your mobile phone or current email address. You must agree to the Google Terms of Service and Privacy Policy before clicking Next step.
  4. The next webpage allows to add a profile photo if you would like. Click Next step to complete the account creation process.

Step 2: Create a new document.

  1. Sign in to Google using the access credentials you created in Step 1. Type http://drive.google.com in your browser and press Enter. This navigates you to Google Drive.
  2. Click the CREATE button to display a drop-down menu that allows you to select the type of document to create. Choose Document. The new document displays. Many of the functions of the Google editor work similarly to Microsoft Word.

Step 3: Share a Google document.

  1. After the blank Google document opens, you can share it with others by clicking the Share button (at the top-right corner of the web page).
  2. Name your new document, then click the Save button.
  3. Here on the Sharing settings web page, in the Add people text field, you can enter Google email names, email addresses, or groups with whom to share this document.
  4. As soon as you start entering information into the Add people box, the box provides more options. The Can edit drop-down menu allows you to choose the document privileges (Can edit, Can comment, and Can view) for the people you add. You can also specify how to notify these people of this document (Send a copy to myself or Paste the item itself into the email). Click Share & save.
  5. Click the Done button. This will navigate you back to the open document.
  6. All users with share privileges can view this document at the same time. Users with edit privileges can edit this document while others view it.
  7. If the document is being viewed by someone while you are in it, you can see who they are by clicking the other viewer(s) drop-down menu (in the upper-right corner of the document).

Step 4: Close a Google document. To close a Google document, move your cursor to the document name at the top of the screen and a left arrow will appear to the left of the name. Click that arrow to return to your Google Drive home page. The document is automatically saved. The new document will appear at the top of your documents list under My Drive.

Step 5: Additional Information Google has developed apps for PCs and Smart phones. For more information about Google Drive, go to http://drive.google.com. YouTube is also a viable source of Google Drive tutorials.

Part 3:

Part 3 of the lab is to explore conferencing and web settings Web meetings combine file and presentation sharing with voice, video, and desktop sharing. Cisco WebEx Meeting Centre is one of the leading web meeting products available today. In Part 3 of this lab, you will watch a video produced by Cisco that reviews the features contained within WebEx Meeting Centre. The video is located on YouTube at the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyaWHEF_aWg

Part 4:

Part 4 of this lab is to CREATE WIKI PAGES. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian-language word that means fast. In networking terms, a wiki is a web-based collaboration tool that permits almost anyone to immediately post information, files, or graphics to a common site for other users to read and modify. A wiki provides access to a home page that has a search tool to assist you in locating the articles that interest you. A wiki can be installed for the Internet community or behind a corporate firewall for employee use. The user not only reads wiki contents, but also participates by creating content within a web browser. Although many different wiki servers are available, the following common features have been formalized into every wiki:

  • Any web browser can be used to view or edit pages or create new content.
  • Edit and auto links are available to edit a page and automatically link pages. Text formatting is similar to creating an email.
  • A search engine is used for quick content location.
  • Access control can be set by the topic creator, defining who is permitted to edit content.
  • A wiki is a grouping of web pages with different collaboration groups.

In this part of the lab, you will use the Google account that you created in Part 2 and create a wiki page in Google Sites.
Step 1: Sign in to Google Sites.
Go to http://sites.google.com sign in using the Google account that you created in Part 2 of this lab.

Step 2: Click CREATE (on top left)
Step 3: Name your new wiki site.
In the Name your site field, type in a name for your new wiki site. You will need to come up with a unique name for your site that has not been used by any other Google user. Google also requires that you enter the code (displayed at the bottom of the screen) to prevent automated scripts, called web robots, from creating multiple sites. After you have entered your site name, click the CREATE button. If someone has used your site name already, you are prompted to enter another name. Also to type the code shown to create the site has an option for visually impaired person.

Step 4: Edit the look of your new wiki site.

  1. Google has provided templates for you to change the look of your new wiki site. Click the More dropdown menu on the top right of the webpage, and then click Manage site .A new page appears where you can edit your site.
  2. Click Themes at the bottom of the left sidebar under manage site option.
  3. Select a theme that appeals to you and click SAVE. Each theme has specific name you can choose accordingly.
  4. After you have saved your theme selection, click your site name under Manage Site.

Step 5: Update the Home page.

  1. The Home page is the first page that everyone sees when they come to your wiki site. You can edit the content of this page by clicking the edit button. From here, you can add text, pictures, or anything else to show on this page.
  2. Click Save after you makes your changes. This takes you out of page edit mode.

Step 6: Create a wiki page

  1. To create a new pages that you and your visitors can use to make posts, click the new page icon, which on the top right of your wiki home page
  2. In the Name your page field, enter a page name.
  3. Then move to Web Page drop-down menu and select Announcements. Google uses this term to indicate a wiki page.
  4. Click CREATE to create your new wiki page.
  5. Your new wiki page displays and has a New post menu option that allows information to be added to the page

Step 7: Share your web site.
A wiki site is not really a wiki site unless other people can contribute. There are a number of ways to share your new site. In this example, we will show you how to share your site to designated people who have G mail accounts.

  1. On your site click share on top left of your new page.
  2. Add a name, email address, or group who you grant access to this site.
  3. As soon as you start entering information into the Add people box, the box provides more options. Right to it there is a Can edit drop-down menu allows you to choose the document privileges (Can edit, Can comment, Can view) for the people you add. You can also specify how to notify these people of this document (Send a copy to myself or Paste the item itself into the email). Click Share & save.
  4. The Manage Site page displays the people who have access to your site. Click your site name to return to your home page.

Step 8: Provide the URL of your site.
You can provide your URL to your new site by adding your site name to the end of the Google site URL, as shown here: http://sites.google.com/site/ (site name).

Step 9: Find additional information.
You can find a quick overview of how a wiki works at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY.

Other examples of wikis and their web sites include:

Reflection:

  1. Can you think of other collaboration tools used in the business world today?
  2. What collaboration tools do you see as useful to a network administrator?

1.2.3.3 Lab – Researching converged Network Services

Objectives:

Part 1: Survey Your Understanding of Convergence
Part 2: Research ISPs Offering Converged Services Part 3: Research Local ISPs Offering Converged Services
Part 4: Select Best Local ISP Converged Service
Part 5: Research Local Company or Public Institution Using Convergence Technologies

Background / Scenario:

Convergence in the context of networking is a term used to describe the process of combining voice, video, and data communications over a common network infrastructure. Converged networks have existed for some time, but were only feasible in large enterprise organizations because of the network infrastructure requirements and complex management required to make them work seamlessly. Technology advances have made convergence readily available to large, medium, and small businesses, as well as for the home consumer.

In Part 1, you will describe your current understanding of convergence and any experience you have with it.
In Part 2, you will research which providers have this service, regardless of geographical location, using the predefined form included in the lab.
In Part 3, you will research which local ISPs in your area offer converged services for end-user consumers, using the predefined form included in the lab.
In Part 4, you will select the ISP you like best for home use and list the reasons why.
In Part 5, you will find a local company or public institution using convergence technologies in their business, using the predefined form included in the lab.

Required Resources:

Device with Internet access.

Part 1: Survey Your Understanding on Convergence

Step 1: Describe convergence as you understand it and give examples of its use in the home.
Write a definition of convergence and list some example.

Part 2: Research ISPs Offering Converged Services

In Part 2, you research and find two or three ISPs who offer converged services for the home, regardless of geographical location.

Step 1: Research various ISPs that offer converged services.

List some of the ISPs that you found in your search.

Step 2: Fill in the following form for the ISPs selected.

Internet Service Provider Product Name of Converged Services
   
   
   

Part 3: Researching Local ISPs Offering Converged Services

In Part 3, you research and find two or three local ISPs who offer converged services for the home in your geographic area.

Step 1: Research various ISPs that offer converged services. List some of the ISPs that you found in your search.

Step 2: Fill in the following form for the ISPs selected.

Internet service provider Product name of converged service Cost per month Download speed
     
     
     

Part 4: Select Best Local ISP Converged Service Offering

Select your top choice from the list of local ISPs that you selected and give reasons why you chose that particular one.

Part 5: Research Local Company or Public Institution Using Convergence Technologies

In Part 5, you research and locate a company in your area that currently uses convergence technologies in their business.

Step 1: Research and find a local company using convergence. In the following table, list the company, industry, and convergence technologies used.

Name of company Industry Convergence technologies
     
     

Reflection:

  1. What are some of the advantages of using convergence technologies?
  2. What are some of the disadvantages of using convergence technologies?

1.3.1.3 Lab -Mapping the Internet

Objectives

Part 1: Test Network Connectivity Using Ping
Part 2: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Windows Tracert
Part 3: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Web-Based and Software Tools
Part 4: Compare Traceroute Results

Background

Route tracing computer software is a utility that lists the networks data has to traverse from the users originating end device to a distant destination network.
This network tool is typically executed at the command line as:
tracert <destination network name or end device address> In Microsoft windows system

 Or 
traceroute <destination network name or end device address>
In UNIX and similar systems.

Route tracing utilities allow a user to determine the path or routes as well as the delay across an IP network. Several tools exist to perform this function.
The traceroute (or tracert) tool is often used for network troubleshooting. By showing a list of routers traversed, it allows the user to identify the path taken to reach a particular destination on the network or across inter networks. Each router represents a point where one network connects to another network and through which the data packet was forwarded. The number of routers is known as the number of "hops" the data traveled from source to destination.

The displayed list can help identify data flow problems when trying to access a service such as a website. It can also be useful when performing tasks such as downloading data. If there are multiple websites (mirrors) available for the same data file, one can trace each mirror to get a good idea of which mirror would be the fastest to use.

Two trace routes between the same source and destination conducted some time apart may produce different results. This is due to the "meshed" nature of the interconnected networks that comprise the Internet and the Internet Protocols ability to select different pathways over which to send packets.

Command-line-based route tracing tools are usually embedded with the operating system of the end device.

Other tools, such as VisualRoute™, are proprietary programs that provide extra information. VisualRoute uses available online information to graphically display the route.

This lab assumes the installation of VisualRoute. If the computer you are using does not have VisualRoute installed, you can download the program using the following link:

http://www.visualroute.com/download.html

Scenario

Using an Internet connection, you will use three route tracing utilities to examine the Internet pathway to destination networks. This activity should be performed on a computer that has Internet access and access to the command line. First, you will use the Windows embedded tracert utility. Second, you will use a web-based traceroute tool (http://www.subnetonline.com/pages/network-tools/online- traceroute.php). Finally, you will use the VisualRoute traceroute program.

Required Resources

1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with Internet access)

Part 1: Test Network Connectivity Using Ping

Step 1: Determine whether the remote server is reachable. To trace the route to a distant network, the PC used must have a working connection to the Internet.

  1. The first tool we will use is ping. Ping is a tool used to test whether a host is reachable. A packet of information is sent to the remote host with instructions to reply. Your local PC measures whether a response is received to each packet, and how long it takes for those packets to cross the network. The name ping comes from active sonar technology in which a pulse of sound is sent underwater and bounced off of terrain or other ships.
  2. From your PC, click the Windows Start icon, type cmd in the Search programs and files box, and then press Enter.
  3. At the command-line prompt, type ping www.cisco.com.
  4. The first output line displays the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net. This is followed by the IP address 23.1.48.170. Cisco hosts the same web content on different servers throughout the world (known as mirrors). Therefore, depending upon where you are geographically, the FQDN and the IP address will be different.
  5. From this portion of output:

Ping statistics for 23.2.128.170:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 224ms, Maximum = 234ms, Average = 227ms
Four pings were sent and a reply was received from each ping. Because each ping was responded to, there was 0% packet loss. On average, it took 227 ms (227 milliseconds) for the packets to cross the network. A millisecond is 1/1,000th of a second.
Streaming video and online games are two applications that suffer when there is packet loss, or a slow network connection. A more accurate determination of an Internet connection speed can be determined by sending 100 pings, instead of the default 4. Here is how to do that:
C:\>ping -n 100 www.cisco.com
And here is what the output from that looks like:
Ping statistics for 23.2.128.170:
Packets: Sent = 100, Received = 100, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 140ms, Maximum = 720ms, Average = 256ms

  1. Now ping Regional Internet Registry (RIR) websites located in different parts of the world:
  • For Africa:

C:\>ping www.afrinic.net
The output looks like
Pinging www.afrinic.net [196.216.2.136] with 32 bytes
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=615ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=618ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=616ms TTL=109
Reply from 196.216.2.136: bytes=32 time=624ms TTL=109
Ping statistics for 196.216.2.136:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 615ms, Maximum = 624ms, Average = 618ms

  • For Australia: C:\>ping www.apnic.net
    Pinging www.apnic.net [202.12.29.211] with 32 bytes of data
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=198ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=195ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=246ms TTL=52
    Reply from 202.12.29.211: bytes=32 time=241ms TTL=52
    Ping statistics for 202.12.29.211:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 195ms, Maximum = 246ms, Average = 220ms
  • For Europe:
		C:\>ping www.ripe.net
Pinging www.ripe.net [193.0.6.139] with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 195.69.144.68: Destination net unreachable.
Request timed out.
Ping statistics for 193.0.6.139:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 1, Lost = 3 (75% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
  • For South America

C:\>ping lacnic.net
Pinging lacnic.net [200.3.14.10] with 32 bytes of data
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=613ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=613ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=620ms TTL=40
Reply from 200.3.14.10: bytes=32 time=817ms TTL=40
Ping statistics for 200.3.14.10:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 613ms, Maximum = 817ms, Average = 665ms
All these pings were run from a computer located in the Australia. What happens to the average ping time in milliseconds when data is traveling within the same continent (Australia) as compared to data from Australia traveling to different continents?
What is interesting about the pings that were sent to the European website?

Part 2: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Tracert

Step 1: Determine what route across the Internet traffic takes to the remote server.
Now that basic reach ability has been verified by using the ping tool, it is helpful to look more closely at each network segment that is crossed. To do this, the tracert tool will be used.

  1. At the command-line prompt, type tracert www.cisco.com.

C:\>tracert www.cisco.com
Tracing route to e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net [23.2.128.170]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4     2 ms     1 ms     2 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    53 ms     9 ms    20 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6     6 ms     2 ms     4 ms  203.215.4.204
  7   175 ms   141 ms   146 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8   161 ms   171 ms   137 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   140 ms   141 ms   140 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *      154 ms     *     po0-3-0.bdr1.sin1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.229]
 11     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 12     *        *      203 ms  pos0-7-0-1.br1.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.5]
 13   225 ms   250 ms   249 ms  20940.tyo.equinix.com [203.190.230.22]
 14   152 ms   141 ms   142 ms  a23-2-128-170.deploy.static.akamaitechnologies.com [23.2.128.170]

Trace complete.

b. Save the tracert output in a text file as follows:
1) Click alt + space this opens the tab with options like restore, minimize move down select edit, in edit select mark.
2) Select all and choose edit > copy.
3) Open the Windows Notepad program: Windows Start icon > All Programs > Accessories > Notepad.
4) Paste the output into the notepad.
5) Choose File > Save As and save the Notepad file to your desktop as tracert1.txt.
c. Run tracert for each destination website and save the output in sequentially numbered files.
C:\>ping www.afrinic.net
C:\>ping www.licnic.net
d. Interpreting tracert outputs.

Routes traced can go through many hops and a number of different Internet Service Providers (ISPs), depending on the size of your ISP and the location of the source and destination hosts. Each “hop” represents a router. A router is a specialized type of computer used to direct traffic across the Internet. Imagine taking an automobile trip across several countries using many highways. At different points in the trip you come to a fork in the road in which you have the option to select from several different highways. Now further imagine that there is a device at each fork in the road that directs you to take the correct highway to your final destination. That is what a router does for packets on a network.

Because computers talk in numbers, rather than words, routers are uniquely identified using IP addresses (numbers with the format x.x.x.x). The tracert tool shows you what path through the network a packet of information takes to reach its final destination. The tracert tool also gives you an idea of how fast traffic is going on each segment of the network. Three packets are sent to each router in the path, and the return time is measured in milliseconds. Now use this information to analyze the tracert results to www.cisco.com. Below is the entire traceroute:

C:\>tracert www.cisco.com

Tracing route to e144.dscb.akamaiedge.net [23.2.128.170] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4    69 ms   120 ms   120 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    16 ms    27 ms     3 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6    17 ms    11 ms     3 ms  203.215.4.204
  7   107 ms   181 ms   155 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8    90 ms    47 ms    61 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   140 ms   143 ms   153 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *      140 ms     *     po0-3-0.bdr1.sin1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.229]
 11     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 12     *        *      140 ms  pos0-7-0-1.br1.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.5]
 13   163 ms   147 ms   151 ms  20940.tyo.equinix.com [203.190.230.22]
 14   147 ms   143 ms   155 ms  a23-2-128-170.deploy.static.akamaitechnologies.com [23.2.128.170]

Trace complete.

Here is the breakdown Consider the first line of tracing route
1 <1 ms <1 ms <1 ms 192.168.100.13
Less than 1 milli second represents the time taken by packet to access the first router.
192.168.100.13 is the address of router on the computer home network
Consider the second line of tracing route
2 <1 ms <1 ms <1 ms dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9]
202.72.135.9 represent hop 2 POP router.
In the example output shown above, the tracert packets travel from the source PC to the local router default gateway (hop 1: 192.168.100.13) to the ISPs Point of Presence (POP) router (hop 2: 202.72.135.9). Every ISP has numerous POP routers. These POP routers are at the edge of the ISP’s network and are the means by which customers connect to the Internet. The packets travel along westnet network for two hops and then jump to a router that belongs to ii.net. This could mean that the packets have traveled to another ISP. This is significant because sometimes there is packet loss in the transition between ISPs, or sometimes one ISP is slower than another.

e. There is an Internet tool known as whois. The whois tool allows us to determine who owns a domain name. A web-based whois tool is found at http://whois.domaintools.com/.

To summarize, Internet traffic starts at a home PC and travels through the home router (hop 1). It then connects to the ISP and travels through its network (hops 2-7) until it arrives at the remote server (hop 8).This is a relatively unusual example in which there is only one ISP involved from start to finish. It is typical to have two or more ISP involved as displayed in the following examples.

f. Now examine an example that involves Internet traffic crossing multiple ISPs. Below is the tracert for www.afrinic.net:

C:\Users>tracert www.afrinic.net

Tracing route to www.afrinic.net [196.216.2.136] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4   132 ms    58 ms    46 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5 ]
  5     3 ms     3 ms     2 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210 ]
  6     2 ms     1 ms     2 ms  203.215.4.204
  7     4 ms     5 ms     1 ms  ae6-10.cr1.per2.on.ii.net [150.101.33.90]
  8     2 ms     3 ms     3 ms  ae0.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.12]
  9   314 ms   313 ms   314 ms  te0-3-0.cor1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.99]
 10     *        *        *     Request timed out.
 11   288 ms   295 ms   286 ms  gi0-0-5.bdr1.lon1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.101]
 12   290 ms     *      287 ms  te0-3-1-0.core1b-dock.isnet.net [195.66.224.198]
 13   526 ms   504 ms   486 ms  core1b-pkl-pos-0-0-5-0.ip.isnet.net [168.209.201 .62]
 14   481 ms   483 ms   487 ms  csw4-pkl-gi1-1.ip.isnet.net [196.26.0.101]
 15   457 ms   457 ms   460 ms  196.37.155.180
 16     *      519 ms   487 ms  fa1-0-1.ar02.jnb.afrinic.net [196.216.3.132]
 17   556 ms   458 ms   458 ms  196.216.2.136

Trace complete.

Question.What happens at hop 7? Is ii.net the same ISP as hops 2-6, or a different ISP? Use the whois tool to answer this question.

Question.What happens in hop 9 to the amount of time it takes for a packet to travel between hop 8 – 9, as compared with earlier hops.

Question.What happens in hop 15? Do a whois lookup on 196.37.155.180 using the whois tool. Who owns this network?

g. Type tracert www.lacnic.net.

C:\Users>tracert lacnic.net

Tracing route to lacnic.net [200.3.14.10] over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  192.168.100.13
  2    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dip-202-72-135-9.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.9 ]
  3    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.99.99.5
  4    14 ms     5 ms     5 ms  dip-202-72-135-5.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.135.5]
  5    32 ms    27 ms     4 ms  gi0-1.edge.qv1.wa.westnet.com.au [202.72.191.210]
  6     4 ms     3 ms     *     203.215.4.206
  7     2 ms     4 ms     *     ae6-10.cr1.per1.on.ii.net [150.101.33.92]
  8    38 ms    35 ms    39 ms  ae1.cr1.adl6.on.ii.net [150.101.33.36]
  9   300 ms   296 ms     *     ae4.br1.syd7.on.ii.net [150.101.33.34]
 10    86 ms    66 ms    92 ms  ae0.br1.syd4.on.ii.net [150.101.33.14]
 11   291 ms   288 ms     *     te0-1-1-2.br2.lax1.on.ii.net [203.16.213.190]
 12   315 ms   288 ms   295 ms  te0-1-0.bdr1.iad1.on.ii.net [203.16.213.186]
 13   405 ms   267 ms   261 ms  xe-2-0-0-0.border-a.ash.ctbc.com.br [206.126.236 .205]
 14   486 ms   488 ms   488 ms  xe-1-3-2-0.core-a.ula001.ctbc.com.br [201.48.45.210]
 15   431 ms   436 ms   435 ms  et-5-0-0-0.core-b.ula001.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.6]
 16   486 ms     *      486 ms  ae3-0.core-b.spo511.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.14]
 17   523 ms   485 ms   483 ms  xe-0-1-0-0.edge-c.spo511.ctbc.com.br [201.48.44.93]
 18   450 ms   446 ms   442 ms  xe-0-0-2.537.gw1.nu.registro.br [187.32.53.69]
 19   473 ms   521 ms   471 ms  xe-5-0-1-0.core1.nu.registro.br [200.160.0.166]
 20   464 ms   456 ms   453 ms  ae0-0.ar3.nu.registro.br [200.160.0.249]
 21   483 ms   486 ms   495 ms  gw01.lacnic.registro.br [200.160.0.212]
 22   480 ms   472 ms   548 ms  200.3.12.36
 23   533 ms   627 ms   578 ms  www.lacnic.net [200.3.14.10]

Trace complete.

Question. What happens in hop 7?

Part 3: Trace a Route to a Remote Server Using Web-Based and Software Tools

The web based and software tools are gives graphical representation of tool which cannot be accessed using NVDA.

1.4.4.3 Lab- Researching IT and Network Job opportunities

Objectives

Part 1: Research Job Opportunities

  • Identify the current networking jobs that are in demand.
  • Explain the value of Cisco certifications in the job market.

Part 2: Reflect on Research

  • Identify current hiring trends in IT/networking.
  • Identify future networking career certifications and skills.
  • Identify additional networking career paths.

Background / Scenario

Jobs in Information Technology (IT) and computer networking continue to grow. Most employers require some form of industry standard certification, degree, or other qualifications from their potential employees, especially those with limited experience. The Cisco CCNA certification is a known and established entry level networking certification that is respected in the industry. There are additional levels and kinds of Cisco certifications that one can attain, and each certification may enhance employment opportunities as well as salary range. In this lab, you will do some targeted job searching on the web, to find what types of IT and computer networking jobs are available; what kinds of skills and certifications you will need; and the salary ranges associated with the various job titles.

Required Resources

  • Device with Internet access

Part 1: Research Job Opportunities

In Part 1, you will use a web browser to visit the popular job listing web sites monster.com and salary.com. Step 1: Open a web browser and go to a job listing website.
In the URL address bar type in http://monster.com and press Enter.
Note: For job listings outside of the US, use the following link to search for your country: http://www.monster.com/geo/siteselection/

Step 2: Search for networking related jobs.

a. Type the word Network in the Job title box. Notice that the website offers context sensitive suggestions based on the keywords provided. Either click on, or finish typing the words, Network Administrator and click the SEARCH button (see image below).
b. Notice the search results.
c. Now focus your search by adding terms to the keywords field box. Try terms like Cisco CCNA, CCNP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, etc.
d. Now try refining your search by adding in different geographical locations. Did you find jobs in the locations you entered?
e. Try searching a different website. Go to http://salary.com and click the Job Search menu bar button.
Note: For salary listings outside of the US, use the following link to search for your country: http://www.payscale.com/rccountries.aspx
f. Now add a search term like Information Technology to the job title field box and click Submit.
g. Spend some time searching for jobs and looking through the search results. Take note of what skills are required for different job titles and the range of starting salaries.

Part 2: Reflect on Research

In Part 2, you answer questions based on your research findings.

a. What job titles did you search for?
b. What skills or certifications were required?
c. Did you find any jobs that you previously did not know existed? If so, what were they?

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Page last modified on August 14, 2013, at 06:17 AM