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Chapter 2 - Lab Procedures and Tools

2.0 Lab Procedures and Tool Used

2.0.1 Introduction >2.0.1.1 Introduction

The image on this page shows three technicians working in a lab setting.

2.1 Safe Lab Procedures

2.1.1 Procedures toProtect People >2.1.1.1 General Safety

The figure on this page shows an image of a clean and organized work area as an example of how to keep a workstation. It also shows an image of a messy and disorganized work area as an example of how not to leave a workstation.

2.1.1 Procedures toProtect People >2.1.1.2 Electrical Safety

The image on this page shows a warning sign that the computer monitor and power supply are high voltage items and can pose a danger if service is attempted by an untrained person.

2.1.1 Procedures toProtect People >2.1.1.3 Fire Safety

The image on this page shows a person using a fire extinguisher to put out a fire.

2.1.2 Procedures to Protect Equipment and data >2.1.2.1 1 ESD and EMI

The figure on this page shows the following three images of sources of electro-static discharge (ESD):

  • A high voltage power line
  • A radio transmission tower
  • Lighting

2.1.2 Procedures to Protect Equipment and data >2.1.2.2 Power Fluctuation Types

The image on this page shows the following LEDs from an uninterrupted power supply (UPS):

  • On Line
  • On Battery
  • Overload
  • Replace Battery

2.1.2 Procedures to Protect Equipment and data >2.1.2.3 Power Protection Devices

The image on this page shows four different styles of surge protectors and surge suppressors.

2.1.3 Procedures to Protect the Environment >2.1.3.1 Material Safety and Data Sheet

The image on this page shows the webpage of the United States Department of Labor. It specifically highlights where to find the Occupational Safety and Health Administration area that links to Material Safety and Data Sheets (MSDS).

2.1.3 Procedures to Protect the Environment >2.1.3.2 Equipment Disposal

The image on this page shows multiple motherboards.

2.2 Proper Use of Tools

2.2.1 Hardware Tools >2..2.1.1 General Tool Use

The image on this page shows a laptop and a set of tools to work on a computer. The set includes various sizes of screwdrivers, needle-nose pliers and a multi-meter.

2.2.1 Hardware Tools >2.2.1.2 ESD Tools

The figure on this page is an interactive activity that gives the following descriptions for an Antistatic Wrist Strap and an Antistatic Mat:

Antistatic Wrist Strap:
An antistatic wrist strap is used to prevent ESD damage to computer equipment

Antistatic Mat:
An antistatic mat is used to stand on or to place hardware on to prevent electricity from building up.

2.2.1 Hardware Tools >2.2.1.3 Hand Tools

The figure is an interactive activity that lists the following twelve common hand tools. As each hand tool is selected an image and description are displayed:

Hand ToolDescription
Flat Head ScrewdriverA Flat Head screwdriver is used to loosen or tighten slotted screws.
Phillips Head ScrewdriverA Phillips Head screwdriver is used to tighten or loosen cross-head screws.
Torx ScrewdriverA Torx screwdriver is used to tighten or loosen screws that have a star-like depression on the top, a feature that is mainly found on laptops.
Hex DriverA Hex Driver, sometimes called a nut driver, is used to tighten or loosen nuts in the same way that a screwdriver tightens screws.
Needle-nose PliersNeedle-nose pliers are used to hold small parts.
Wire CuttersWire Cutters are used to strip and cut wires.
TweezersTweezers are used to manipulate small parts.
Part RetrieverA Part Retriever is used to retrieve parts from locations that are too small for your hand to fit.
FlashlightA Flashlight is used to light up areas that you cannot see well.
Wire StripperA Wire Stripper is used to remove the insulation from wire so that it can be twisted to other wires or crimped to connectors to make a cable.
CrimperA Crimper is used to attach connectors to wires.
Punch Down ToolA Punch Down tool is used to terminate wire into termination blocks. Some cable connectors must be connected to cables using a Punch Down tool.

2.2.1 Hardware Tools >2.2.1.4 Cleaning Tools

The figure is an interactive activity that lists the following four common cleaning tools. As each cleaning tool is selected an image and description are displayed:

Cleaning ToolDescription
Soft, Lint-free ClothA soft, lint-free cloth is used to clean different computer components without scratching or leaving debris.
Compressed AirCompressed air is used to blow away dust and debris from different computer parts without touching the components.
Cable TiesCable ties are used to bundle cables neatly inside and outside of a computer.
Parts OrganiserA parts organiser is used to hold screws, jumpers, fasteners, and other small parts and prevents them from getting mixed together.

2.2.1 Hardware Tools >2.2.1.5 Diagnostic Tools

Image 1 on this page shows a digital multi-meter which is used to test the integrity of circuits and the quality of electricity in computer components.

Image 2 on this page shows a loopback adapter which is used to test the basic functionality of computer ports.

IImage 3 on this page shows a Toner Probe which is used to trace cables.

Image 4 on this page shows an external enclosure which houses a hard drive that can be used to diagnose a customer's hard drive or computer that does not boot. The external enclosure can also be used to create backups of a customer's hard drive.

2.2.2 Software Tool >2.2.2.1 Disk Management Tools

The figure is an interactive activity that lists the following seven disk management tools. As each disk management tool is selected a screen capture is displayed:

FDISK.
The image displays the following Command Prompt output:

Microsoft Windows 98
Fixed Disk Setup Program
(C)Copyright Microsoft Corp. 1983 - 1988

FDISK Options

Current fixed disk drive: 1

Choose one of the following:

@@# Create DOS partition or Logical DOS Drive

  1. Set active partition
  2. Delete partition or Logical DOS Drive
  3. Display partition information@@

Enter choice: [1]

Press Esc to exit FDISK

END OF COMMAND PROMPT OUTPUT

Disk Management.
The image displays the Windows Disk Management window.

Format.
The image displays the Windows Disk Management window highlighting the details of Disk 0, C drive.

Scandisk or Chkdsk.
The image displays the following CHKDSK output:

The type of the file system is NTFS.
Volume label is System.

WARNING! F parameter not specified.
Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
 1 percent complete. (23732 of 237312 file records processed)

END OF CHKDSK OUTPUT

Defrag.
The image displays the Windows Disk Defragmenter window.

Disk Cleanup.
The image displays the Windows Disk Cleanup dialog box

System File Checker.
The image displays the following Command Prompt output:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\Windows\system32>sfc /scannow

Beginning system scan. This process will take some time.

Beginning verification phase of system scan.
Verification 100% complete.

Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.

C:\Windows\system32>

END OF COMMAND PROMPT OUTPUT

2.2.2 Software Tool >2.2.2.2 Protection Software Tools

The figure is an interactive activity that lists the following four protection software tools. As each protection software tool is selected a screen capture is displayed:

Windows 7 Action Centre.
The image displays the Windows & Action center window.

Antivirus Program.
The image displays the Microsoft Security Essentials window.

Antispyware Program.
The image displays the Windows Defender window.

Windows 7 Firewall.
The image displays the Windows Firewall window.

2.2.2 Software Tool >2.2.2.3: Worksheet - Diagnostic Software

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files.

2.2.3 Organisational Tools >2.2.3.1 Reference Tools

The image on this page shows a screen capture of the Microsoft TechNet Support website for technical solutions regarding Microsoft products.

2.2.3 Organisational Tools >2.2.3.2 Miscellaneous Tools

Image 1 on this page shows different types of computer screws seperated and labelled to show type and quantity.

Image 2 on this page shows pictures of the following types of computer replacement parts:

  • Case Fan
  • Motherboard
  • CPU Fan
  • Power Supply
  • RAM
  • Hard Drive
  • Network Interface Card (NIC)
  • Sound Adapter card
  • Video Adapter card
  • Solid State Drive (SSD)

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.1 Antistatic Wrist Strap

The image on this page shows a computer technician wearing an antistatic wrist strap.

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.2 Antistatic Mat

The image ion this page shows a computer case and components placed on top of an antistatic mat.

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.3 Hand Tools

Image 1 on this page shows proper screwdriver use. Clockwise to tighten a screw and counter clockwise to loosen a screw.

Image 2 on this page shows a screw with stripped thread.

Image 3 on this page illustrates that a Flat Head screwdriver should be used only for Flat Head screws and not for Phillips Head screws.

Image 4 on this page shows a Phillips Head screwdriver being used on a Phillips Head screw.

Image 5 on this page shows a Hex Driver

Image 6 on this page shows the following component retrievel tools:

  • Needle Nose pliers
  • Tweezers

Image 7 on this page is an interactive activity showing a Fluke Networks 110 Multimeter. The activity allows the learner to understand the various parts of a multimeter. As each part is highlighted the following descriptions are displayed:

PartDescription
DisplayTo view information displayed.
Hold buttonDisplay HOLD is enabled. Display freezes the present reading. In MIN MAX AVG mode, the MIN MAX AVG recording is paused.
MIN MAX AVG buttonMIN MAX AVG mode is enabled. Minimum, maximum, or average reading is displayed.
Range buttonThe Meter selects the range with the best resolution. In manual range mode, the user selects the range.
Dial* Power Off
* AC - Alternating current, from 300 mV to 600 V
* DC - Direct current, from 1mV to 600 V
* Beeper - Turns on at less than 20 Ohms and turns off at greater than 250 Ohms
* Ohms - From 0.1 Ohms to 40 Mega Ohms
* Diodes - Tests diodes. A result of 'OL' indicates that an open diode is present
* Capacitance - From 1 nF to 9999 µF
COMCommon (return) terminal for all measurements. When measuring voltages, this is often referred to as ground
Input TerminalInput terminal for voltage, continuity, resistance, diode test, capacitance, and voltage frequency measurements

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.4: Lab - Using a Multimeter and a Power Supply Tester

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files.

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.5: Lab - Testing UPC Cables Using a Loopback Plug and Cable Meter

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files.

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.6: Cleaning Materials

Image 1 on this page shows severe dust build up on computer components.

Image 2 on this page shows a table listing the computer components that should be cleaned and correct cleaning materials to use.

ComponentCleaning Material
Computer case and outside of monitorMild cleaning solution and lint-free cloth
LCD ScreenLCD cleaning solution or distilled water and lint-free cloth
CRT ScreenDistilled water and lint-free cloth
Heat sinkCompressed air
RAMIsopropyl alcohol and lint-free cloth
KeyboardHand-held vacuum cleaner with a brush attachment
MouseMild cleaning solution and lint-free cloth

2.2.4 Demonstrate Proper Tool Use >2.2.4.7: Lab - Computer Disassembly

See IT Essentials 5.0 Labs and Worksheets Accessible Files.

2.3 Lab Procedures and Tool Use

2.3.1 Summary >2.3.1.1 Summary

The image on this page shows 3 students working with hand tools on a piece of computer hardware.

End of Chapter 2: Lab Procedures and Tool Use.

Next - Chapter 3: Computer Assembly.

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Page last modified on March 26, 2015, at 01:44 AM