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Chapter 2 – Configuring a Network Operating System

2.0 Configuring a Network Operating System

2.0.1 Introduction >2.0.1.1 Introduction to Cisco IOS

Upon the completion of this learner you will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of Cisco IOS
  • Explain how to access and navigate Cisco IOS to configure network devices.
  • Describe the command structure of Cisco IOS software
  • Configure the hostnames on a Cisco IOS devices using the CLI
  • Use the Cisco IOS commands to limit the access to device configuration
  • Use Cisco IOS commands to save the running configuration
  • Explain how devices communicate across the media
  • Configure a host device with an IP address.
  • Verify connectivity between two end devices.

2.0.1 Introduction >2.0.1.2 Class Activity –It is Just an Operating System!

The figure on this page shows an 1800 series router with the functions of a router Security, Routing, QoS, Addressing, Interface, and managing Resources

The description given for this figure is "All Cisco network devices use an operating system otherwise known as internetwork operating system or IOS."

Objectives

Describe the command structure of Cisco IOS software.
In this activity, you will recognize that the text commands used in command –line interfaces are intentionally chosen from spoken language. Text commands are often abbreviated or otherwise simplified in their syntax, to keep resulting command set concise. They may be grouped into context modes that simplify their usage. Configuring devices using written commands is similar to giving out short orders verbally. The commands are executed by the operating system and the actual purpose is performed by the device.

2.1 I.O.S. Bootcamp

2.1.1 Cisco I.O.S. >2.1.1.1 Operating Systems

The figure on this page represents the operating system as three concentric circles. The circles are labelled as follows:

  • The outer circle is labelled Shell: The user interface that allows users to request specific tasks from the computer. These requests can be made either through the CLI or GUI interfaces.
  • The middle circle is labelled Kernel: Communications between the hardware and software of a computer and manages how hardware resources are used to meet the software requirements.
  • The inner circle is labelled Hardware the physical part of a computer including underlying electronics.

2.1.1 Cisco I.O.S. >2.1.1.2 Purpose of OS

Image 1 on this page shows a picture of a Cisco CCO account logged in to the IOS downloads page for a Catalyst 2960 switch.

Image 2 on this page shows a picture of a Cisco CCP account logged in to the IOS downloads page for a 2900 series router.

2.1.1 Cisco I.O.S. >2.1.1.3 Location of the Cisco IOS

The image on this page shows a Cisco 64 megabyte Compact Flash Card.

2.1.1 Cisco I.O.S. >2.1.1.4 IOS Functions

The figure on this page shows an 1800 series router with the following functions listed::

  • Security
  • Routing
  • QoS
  • Addressing
  • Managing Resources
  • Interface

The description given for this figure is "Internetwork Operating System for Cisco networking devices."

2.1.1 Cisco IOS >2.1.1.5 Video Demonstration – CCO accounts and IOS image exploration

The YouTube video on this page , titled " Cisco Account Benefits and Cisco IOS Files" describes how to obtain a CCO account and what it is used for. It can be accessed via the following link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28fTWnjPm_U#at=100

2.1.2 Accessing a Cisco IOS Devices > 2.1.2.1 Console Access Method

The image on this page shows the rear view of a Cisco 1941 router with the Console port highlighted.

2.1.2 Accessing a Cisco IOS Devices > 2.1.2.2 Telnet, SSH, and AUX Access Methods

The image on this page shows the rear view of a Cisco 1941 router with the AUX port highlighted.

2.1.2 Accessing a Cisco IOS Devices > 2.1.2.3 Terminal Emulation Programs

The three images on this page show three terminal emulation programs as follows:

  • Figure 1 shows the setup window for PuTTY.
  • Figure 2 shows the setup window for Tera Term.
  • Figure 3 shows the setup window for Secure CRT

2.1.2 Accessing a Cisco IOS Devices > 2.1.2.4 Activity – Accessing Devices

The figure on this page is a table with four columns. Nine scenarios are listed in the first column as follows:

  1. You are in an equipment room with a new switch that need to be configured.
  2. The device you are configuring cannot be accessed with a cable, because you are not in the building .You dial a telephone to dial into it.
  3. Your manager gives you a special cable and tells you to use it to configure the switch.
  4. You access the IOS by using another intermediary device over a network connection.
  5. You are on vacation and need to check one of your routers. The only access you have is your hotel analog phone.
  6. You do not need remote access services to the networking device to configure it because the device is physically accessible to you.
  7. You call your manager to tell him you cannot access your router in another city over the internet. He provides you with the information to access the switch through a telephone connection.
  8. The password for a device was changed. No one knows what the new password is and you need to reset a new password.
  9. You use a password-encrypted connection to a remotely access a device over a network.

The other three columns have headings of:

  • Console
  • Telnet/SSH
  • AUX

The user is asked to select the most appropriate access method for each scenario.

The figure also has the following 2 buttons:

  • Check
  • Reset

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.1 Cisco IOS Modes of Operation

The figure on this page shows the hierarchical relationship between the different modes of the Cisco I O S from most basic to most specialized. The major modes in hierarchical order are as follows:

  • User executive (User EXEC) mode
    Appears in window as Router>
    Typical prompts and features are: ping, show (limited), enable etc.
  • Privileged executive (Privileged EXEC) mode
    Appears in window as Router#
    Typical prompts and features are: all User EXEC commands, debug commands, reload, configure etc.
  • Global configuration mode
    Appears in window as: Router(config)#
    Typical prompts and features are: hostname, enable secrecy, ip route.
    Use this mode to configure:
    • interface for ip address, i p v 6 address, encapsulation, shutdown/no shutdown etc.
    • router for network, version, auto summary etc.
    • line for password, login, modem commands etc.

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.2 Primary Modes

The figure on this page is a flowchart consisting of two rectangles displaying the command prompts for both a Router and a Switch for two primary modes of operation as follows:

  • The first rectangle represents User EXEC mode. This mode allows only a limited number of basic monitoring commands and is often referred to as view–only mode. User EXEC prompts are:
    • Router>
    • Switch>
  • The second rectangle represents Privileged EXEC mode .This mode by default allows all monitoring commands, as well as execution of configuration and management commands. Privileged EXEC prompts are:
    • Router#
    • Switch#

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.3 Global Configuration Mode and Submodes.

Figure 1 on this page is a flowchart consisting of three rectangles demonstrating how the command prompt changes depending on which mode you are in as follows:

  • Privilege EXEC mode. The functions possible in this mode are: Detailed examination of router, Debugging and testing, File manipulation and remote access. Privileged EXEC prompts are:
    • Switch#
    • Router#
  • Global configuration mode. From global configuration mode, CLI configuration changes are made that affect the operation of the device as a whole. Global Configuration Mode prompts are:
    • Switch(config)#
    • Router(config)#
  • Other configuration modes:. Each of these modes allows the configuration of a particular part or function of the IOS device. Prompts for specific service or interface configurations are:
    • Switch(config-mode)#
    • Router(config-mode)#

Within Privilege EXEC mode, network administrator can access the global configuration mode and all other sub configuration modes.

Figure 2 shows an example of User Exec prompt with a Ping command as follows:

  • The IOS Prompt Structure is:
    Router>ping 192.168.10.5
    Router#show running-config
    Router(config)#Interface FastEthernet 0/0
    Router(config-if)#i p address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
  • The prompt changes to denote the current CLI mode as follows:
    Switch>ping 192.168.10.9
    Switch#show running-config
    Switch(config)#Interface FastEthernet 0/1
    Switch(config-if)#Description connection to WEST LAN4

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.4 Navigating between IOS Modes

The figure on this page shows how to alternate between User Exec mode and Privileged Exec mode using the enable and disable commands on both a Router and a Switch as followws.

The figure has the following 2 buttons:

  • Switch
  • Router

When the Switch button is selected the window displays the following:

  Switch con0 is now available.
Press RETURN to get started.
User Access Verification
Password:
Switch>
(This is the User EXEC Mode Prompt)
Switch>enable
Password:
Switch#
(This is the Privileged EXEC Mode Prompt)
Switch#disable
Switch>
(Return to the User EXEC Mode Prompt)
Switch>exit

When the Router button is selected the window displays the following:

  Router con0 is now available.
Press RETURN to get started.
User Access Verification
Password:
Router>
(This is the User EXEC Mode Prompt)
Router>enable
Password:
Router#
(This is the Privileged EXEC Mode Prompt)
Router#disable
Router>
(Return to the User EXEC Mode Prompt)
Router>exit

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.5 Navigating between IOS Modes continued

The three figures on this page illustrate moving from and to Global Configuration Mode and Submodes.

Figure 1 on this page shows how to navigate back out of v lan1 interface configuration one level at a time using the exit command as follows:

Switch>enable
Switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
End with CNTL/Z (Control Z).
Switch(config)#interface v lan1
Switch(config-if)#exit
Switch(config)#exit
Switch#

Figure 2 shows how to navigate back out of v lan1 configuration to Privileged Exec mode using the end command as follows:

Switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
End with CNTL/Z (Control Z).
Switch(config)#v lan1
Switch(config-vlan)#end
Switch#

Figure 3 shows how to navigate back out of v t y configuration to Privileged Exec mode using the end command as follows:

Switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
End with CNTL/Z (Control Z).
Switch(config)#line v t y 0 4
Switch(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0/1
Switch(config-if)#end
Switch#

2.1.3 Navigating the IOS >2.1.3.6 Video demonstration – Navigating the IOS

The YouTube video on this page , titled " Navigating the Cisco IOS" demonstrates the use of the question mark as a help tool while navigating through different modes of the Cisco IOS It can be accessed via the following link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKvZDCL-zh8#t=27

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.1 IOS Command Structure

Figure 1 on this page illustrates a command and identifies the different parts: the command prompt, the command, and keywords or arguments.

The command syntax is as follows:

  • the syntax to ping an IP address:
    Switch>ping 192.168.10.5
  • the syntax to see IP protocols:
    Switch>show IP protocols

The breakdown of the syntax is as follows:

PromptSwitch>
CommandsShow
ping
Space
Keywords
or
Arguments
192.168.10.5
i p protocols

Figure 2 on this page is a table listing the following conventions generally used in the text when describing the use of commands:

ConventionDescription
boldfaceBoldface text indicates commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown.
ItalicsItalic text represents the arguments for which you supply values.
[x]Square brackets indicate an optional element (keyword or argument).
{x}Braces indicate a required element (keyword or argument)
[x{y|z}]Braces and vertical lines within square brackets indicate a required choice within an optional element.

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.2 Cisco IOS Command Reference

The image on this page shows the Cisco website where you can lookup any IOS command.

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.3 Context -Sensitive Help

The figure on this page shows the following example of using the question mark for help while configuring the clock on a Cisco device:

Switch#cl?
Clear clock
(Command options- display a list of commands or keywords that start with the characters c l)
Switch#clock set ?
hh:mm:ss Current Time
(Command explanation – the IOS displays what commend arguments or variables can be next, and provides an explanation of each.)
Switch#clock set 19:50:00 ?
<1 – 31> Day of the month
MONTH Month of the year
(Command explanation with more than one argument or variable option)
Switch#clock set 19:50:00 25 June 2012
Switch#

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.4 Command Syntax Check

Figure 1 shows the following examples of three different potential errors while configuring a device.

  • Example 1:
Switch#>clock set
%incomplete command
Switch#clock set 19:50:00
%incomplete command

The IOS returns a help message indicating that required keywords or arguments were left off the end of the command.

  • Example 2:
Switch#c
%Ambiguous command: 'c' \

The IOS returns a help message to indicate that there were not enough characters entered for the command interpreter to recognize the command.

  • Example 3:
Switch#clock set 19:50:00 25 6
^ (A carat symbol is displayed directly beneath the 6 in the previous line)
%Invalid input detected at ‘^’ marker.

The IOS returns a ‘^’ to indicate where the command interpreter cannot decipher the command.

Figure 2 is a table that describes the three error messages as follows:

Error messageMeaningExamplesHow to get Help
%Ambiguous command:
‘command’
Not enough characters were entered for the IOS to recognize the commandSwitch#c
%Ambiguous command:’c’
Re-enter the command followed by a question mark (?) with no space between the command and the question mark.
The possible keywords that you can enter with the command are displayed.
%Incomplete commandNot all of the required keywords or arguments were entered.Switch#clock set
%Incomplete command.
Re-enter the command followed by a question mark (?) with a space after last word.The required keywords or arguments are displayed
%Invalid input detected at ‘^’ markerThe command was entered incorrectly. The error occurred where the caret mark (^) appears.Switch#clock set 19:50:00 25 6
^
Invalid input detected at ‘^’ marker.
Re-enter the command followed by a question mark (?) in a place pointed by ‘^’ mark.It maybe necessary to delete last keyword(s) or argument(s)

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.5 Hot Keys and Shortcuts

The 3 tables on this page list the following CLI hot keys and shortcuts:

  • Table 1: CLI Line Editing:
CLI Line Editing
TabCompletes a partial command name entry.
BackspaceErases the character to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl+DErases the character at the cursor.
Ctrl+KErases all characters from the cursor to the end of the command line.
Esc+DErases all characters from the cursor to the end of the word.
Ctrl+U or Ctrl+XErases all characters from the cursor back to the beginning of the command line.
Ctrl+WErases the word to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl+AMoves the cursor to the beginning of the line.
Left Arrow or Ctrl+BMoves the cursor one character to the left.
Esc+BMoves the cursor back one word to left.
Esc+FMoves the cursor forward one word to right.
Right arrow or Ctrl+FMoves the cursor one character to right.
Ctrl+EMoves the cursor to the end of the command line.
Up arrow or Ctrl+PRecalls command in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent commands.
Ctrl+R or Ctrl+l or Ctrl+LRedisplays the system prompt and command line after a console message is received.

(NOTE: Delete, the key to erase to the right of the cursor, is not recognised by terminal emulation programs.)

  • Table 2: At the More prompt:
At the ''----More----"" prompt
Enter keyDisplays the next line.
Space barDisplays the next screen.
Any keyEnds the display string, returning to privileged EXEC mode.
  • Table 3: Break Keys:
Break Keys
Ctrl+CWhen in any configuration mode, ends the configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.
When in setup mode, aborts back to the command prompt.
Ctrl+ZWhen in any configuration mode, ends the configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.
Ctrl+Shift+6All purpose break sequence. Use to abort DNS lookups, traceroutes, pings.

NOTE: Control keys: Press and hold the Control key and then press the specified letter key.

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.6 IOS Examination Commands

The figure on this page illustrates how IOS show commands can provide information about the configuration, operation and status of parts of a Cisco switch or router as follows:

Interacting ComponentCommand
Internetwork Operating SystemSwitch#show version
ProgramsSwitch#show processes
Switch#show c d p neighbors
Active Configuration FileSwitch#show running-config
Tables and BuffersSwitch#show a r p
Switch#show mac-address-table
Switch#show v lan
Backup Configuration FileSwitch#show startup-config
FlashSwitch#show flash
InterfacesSwitch#show interfaces

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.7 The show version Command

Figure 1 displays a sample output from a show version command on a Cisco 1941 ISR Router as follows:

Router#show version
Cisco IOS Software, C1900 Software (C1900-UNIVERSALK9-M), Version 15.2(4)M1, RELEASE SOFTWARE (f c 1)
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport
Copyright (c) 1986 - 2012 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 26-Jul-12 19:34 by prod_rel_team
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 15.0(1r)M15, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
cisco1941 uptime is 41 minutes
system returned to ROM by power-on
System image file is ""flash0:c1900-universalk9-mz.SPA.152-4.M1.bin""
Last reload type: Normal Reload
Last reload reason: power-on

Figure 2 displays a sample output from a show version command on a Cisco 2960 Catalyst Switch as follows:

Switch#show version
Cisco IOS Software, C2960 Software (C2960-LANBASEK9-M), Version 15.0(2)SE, RELEASE SOFTWARE (f c 1)
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport
Copyright (c) 1986-2012 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Sat 28-Jul-12 19:34 by prod_rel_team
ROM: Bootstrap program is C2960 boot loader
BOOTLDR: C2960 Boot Loader (C2960-HBOOT-M) Version 12.2(53r)SEY3, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
switch uptime is 44 minutes
system returned to ROM by power-on
System image file is ""flash0:c2960-lanbasek9-mz.150-2.SE.bin""\

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.8 Packet Tracer - Navigating the IOS

Objectives:

Part 1: Basic Connections, Accessing the CLI and Exploring Help
Part 2: Exploring EXEC Modes
Part 3: Setting the Clock

2.1.4 The Command Structure >2.1.4.9 Lab - Establishing a Console Session with Tera Term

See Lab Descriptions

2.2 Getting Basic

2.2.1 Hostnames >2.2.1.1 Why the Switch

The image on this page shows the front view of a 2960 switch.

2.2.1 Hostnames >2.2.1.2 Device Names

The figure on this page depicts a technician connected to a switch that is part of a network. Each switch in the network has the default name "Switch" demonstrating how important it is to name the devices appropriately.

The description given for this figure is "Without names, network devices are difficult to identify for configuration purposes."

2.2.1 Hostnames >2.2.1.3 Hostnames

The figure on this page depicts a technician connected to a switch that is part of a network. Each switch is named with a descriptive name so it is easy to know which device you are configuring as follows:

  • S.w.-Floor-1
  • S.w.-Floor-2
  • S.w.-Floor-3

The description given for this figure is "With names, network devices are easy to identify for configuration purposes."

2.2.1 Hostnames >2.2.1.4 Configuring Hostnames

The figure on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice entering the command to configure hostnames. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

Configure the switch hostname to be "Sw-Floor-1"
Switch# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Switch(config)# hostname Sw-Floor-1
Sw-Floor-1(config)# You successfully configured the switch hostname.

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.2.2 Limiting Access to Device Configurations >2.2.2.1 Securing Device Access

The figure on this page lists the following ways to limit access to network devices:

  • Secure privileged EXEC access.
  • Secure user EXEC access.
  • Secure Telnet access.
  • Encrypt all passwords.

2.2.2 Limiting Access to Device Configurations >2.2.2.2 Securing Privileged EXEC Access

The figure on this page demonstrates how to configure an encrypted privileged EXEC mode password using the "enable secret" command as follows:

S.w.-Floor-1>enable
S.w.-Floor-1#
S.w.-Floor-1#conf terminal
S.w.-Floor-1(config)#enable secret class
S.w.-Floor-1(config)#exit
S.w.-Floor-1#
S.w.-Floor-1#disable
S.w.-Floor-1>enable
Password:
S.w.-Floor-1#

2.2.2 Limiting Access to Device Configurations >2.2.2.3 Securing User EXEC Access

The figure on this page demonstrates how to configure a password for the console and vty lines as follows:

S.w.-Floor-1(config)#line console 0
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#password cisco
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#login
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#exit
S.w.-Floor-1(config)#
S.w.-Floor-1(config)#line v t y 0 4
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#password cisco
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#login
S.w.-Floor-1(config-line)#

2.2.2 Limiting Access to Device Configurations >2.2.2.4 Encrypting Password Display

The figure on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice entering the command to configure password encryption. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

  1. Enter the command to encrypt the plain text passwords.
    Switch(config)#service password-encryption
  2. Exit global configuration mode and view the running configuration.
    Switch(config)#exit
    Switch#show running-config
    !
    <output omitted>
    !
    line con 0
    password 7 094F471A1A0A
    login
    !
    line v t y 0 4
    password 7 03095A0F034F38435B49150A1819
    login
    !
    !
    end
Switch#

You successfully encrypted the plain text passwords.'

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.2.2 Limiting Access to Device Configurations >2.2.2.5 Banner Messages

The figure on this page illustrates how to configure a Message of the Day banner message:

The following Message of the Day (MOTD) command:

S.w.-Floor-1(config)#banner m o t d # This is a secure system.Authorized Access Only!!! #

Displays in the terminal window when you attempt to access the switch as:

S.w.-Floor-1 con 0 is now available
Press RETURN to get started

This is a secure system. Authorized Access Only!!! (Delimiting '#' characters are not included in the message.)
User Access Verification
Password:
S.w.1-Floor-1>enable
Password:
S.w.1-Floor-1#

2.2.3 Saving Configurations >2.2.3.1 Configuration Files

Figure 1 on this page displays how to display the current running configuration as well as how to save the current running configuration to the startup configuration in n v ram as follows:

Switch#show running–config (Lists the complete configuration currently active in RAM)
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 2904 bytes
!
! Last configuration change at 00:02:32
UTC Mon Mar 1 1993
!
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec
service timestamps log datetime msec
no service password-encryption
<output>
!

The active configuration can be copied to NV RAM using the following command:

Switch#copy running-config startup-config

Figure 2 on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice entering commands to save the running configuration from RAM to NV RAM. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

  1. Enter the command to save the running configuration stored in RAM to NV RAM
    Switch# copy running-config startup-config

The configuration in RAM and the configuration in NV RAM are now the same. If you want to restore the switch to its default “out-of-box” configuration, you must enter two commands.

  1. First, enter the command that will remove v lan.dat file.
    Switch# delete v lan.dat
    Delete filename [v lan.dat] ?
    Delete flash:v lan.dat? [confirm]
  2. Now enter the command to remove the configuration stored in NV RAM.
    Switch# erase startup-config
    Erasing the n v ram filesystem will remove all configuration
    files! Continue? [confirm]
    [OK]
    Erase of n v ram: complete
  3. The final step to return a switch to its default configuration is to reboot the switch.
    Switch# reload
    Proceed with reload? [confirm]
    C2960 Boot Loader (C2960-HBOOT-M) Version 12.2(25r)FX, RELEASE
    SOFTWARE (f c 4)
    Cisco W.S.-C2960-24TT (RC32300) processor (revision C 0) with
    21039K bytes of memory.
    2960-24TT starting...
    <output omitted>
  4. Enter privileged EXEC mode and view current configuration stored in V RAM.
    Switch>enable
Switch#show startup-config
startup-config is not present
Switch#

'''The switch is restored to its default “out-of-box” configuration. You successfully saved and then erased the switch configuration.

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.2.3 Saving Configurations >2.2.3.2 Capturing Text

Figure 1 displays how to save the running configuration to a text file using the log function of Tera Term as follows:

  1. Start the log process
  2. Issue a show-running config command
  3. Close the log

Figure 2 displays how to save the running configuration to a text file using the capture text function of HyperTerminal as follows:

  1. Start the text capture process
  2. Issue a show running-config command
  3. Stop the capture process
  4. Save the text file

2.2.3 Saving Configurations >2.2.3.3 Packet Tracer - Configuring Initial Switch Settings

Objectives

Part 1: Verify the Default Switch Configuration
Part 2: Configure a Basic Switch Configuration
Part 3: Configure a MOTD Banner
Part 4: Save Configuration Files to NV RAM
Part 5: Configure S2

2.3 Address Schemes

2.3.1 Ports and Addresses >2.3.1.1 IP Addressing of Devices

The figure on this page displays the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box for Microsoft Windows.

2.3.1 Ports and Addresses >2.3.1.2 Interfaces and Ports

This page shows several pictures. One picture of several fixed port switches, two pictures of copper media, two pictures of fiber optic media, and three pictures of wireless devices.

2.3.2 Addressing Devices >2.3.2.1 Configuring a Switch Virtual Interface

The figure on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice configuring a switch virtual interface by entering commands in the figure. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

  1. Enter interface configuration mode for V LAN1.
    Switch(config)# interface v lan1
  2. Configure the i p address as ‘192.168.10.2’ and the subnet mask as ‘255.255.255.0’.
    Switch(config-if)# i p address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0
  3. Activate the interface.
    Switch(config-if)#no shutdown
    %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface V lan1, changed state to up
Switch(config-if)#

You successfully configured the V LAN1 interface.

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.3.2 Addressing Devices >2.3.2.2 Manual IP Address Configuration for End Devices

The figures on this page illustrate how to manually assign the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway in the TCP/IP properties of a network connection.

To manually configure an IP address for an end device:

  1. Open Local Area Connection Properties.
  2. Under the general tab select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and then choose properties.
  3. Under the tab Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties select Use the following IP address.
  4. Enter I P address
  5. Subnet mask
  6. Default gateway

2.3.2 Addressing Devices >2.3.2.3 Automatic IP Address Configuration for End Devices

Figure 1 on this page illustrates how to automatically assign the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway in the TCP/IP properties of a network connection by using DHCP.

To automatically configure an IP address for an end device:

  1. Open Local Area Connection Properties.
  2. Under the general tab select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and then choose properties.
  3. Under the tab Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties select the following two options:
    • Obtain an IP address automatically
    • Obtain DNS server address automatically

Figure 2 on this page is a Syntax Checker used to to practice displaying the IP address of a Windows PC by entering commands. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

Enter the command to display the IP configuration on a Windows PC.

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
C:\> i p config
Windows IP Configuration
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix.: cisco.com
Link-local I P v 6 Address....:
fe80::b0ef:ca42:af2c:c6c7%16
I P v 4 Address...............: 10.852.240.197
Subnet Mask................: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway............: 10.82.240.198

You successfully displayed the IP configuration on a Windows PC.

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.3.2 Addressing Devices >2.3.2.4 I P address Conflicts

The figure on this page shows an error message you might see if there is an IP address conflict on the network as follows:

Network error
Windows has detected an IP address conflict
Another computer on this network has the same IP address as this computer .Contact your network administrator for help resolving this issue. More details are available in the Windows System event log.

2.3.2 Addressing Devices >2.3.2.5 Packet Tracer- Implementing Basic Connectivity

Objectives

Part 1: Perform a Basic Configuration on S1 and S2
Part 2: Configure the PC's
'''Part 3: Configure the Switch Management Interface

2.3.3 Verifying Network Connectivity>2.3.3.1 Test the Loopback Address on an End Device

Figure 1 on this page displays the Windows Local Area Network connection properties and a command (ping) to test that the TCP/IP stack is working properly in Windows with the following results:

  • Pinging the local host confirms that TCP/IP is installed and working on the local network adapter.
  • Pinging 127.0.0.1 causes a device to ping itself.

Figure 2 on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice testing a loopback address by entering commands. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

Enter the command to test a loopback address on a Windows PC.

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
C:\> ping 127.0.0.1
Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms T T L=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms T T L=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms T T L=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms T T L=128
Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
C:\>

You successfully tested the loopback address.

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.3.3 Verifying Network Connectivity >2.3.3.2 Testing the Interface Assignment

The figure on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice verification of a V LAN interface by entering commands. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible::

  1. Enter the command to verify the interface configuration on S1
    S1#show ip interface brief
Interface
Protocol
IP-AddressOK?MethodStatus
FastEthernet 0/1unassignedYESmanualup up
FastEthernet 0/2unassignedYESmanualup up
<output omitted>    
V lan1192.168.10.2YESmanualup up
  1. '''You are now on S2 Enter the command to verify the interface configuration on

S 2'''
S2#show i p interface brief

Interface
Protocol
I P AddressOK?MethodStatus
FastEthernet 0/1unassignedYESmanualup up
FastEthernet 0/2unassignedYESmanualup up
<output omitted>    
Vlan1192.168.10.3YESmanualup up

You successfully verified the interface assignment on S1 and S2'

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.3.3 Verifying Network Connectivity >2.3.3.3 Testing End-to-End Connectivity

The figure on this page is a Syntax Checker used to practice entering the ping command. The Syntax Checker is inaccessible:

  1. '''You are on the command line for PC1 Enter the command to verify connectivity to the S1 V LAN interface at '192.168.10.2'.
    C:\>ping 192.168.10.2
Pinging 192.168.10.2 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=838ms TTL=35
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=820ms TTL=35
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=883ms TTL=36
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=828ms TTL=36
Ping statistics for 192.168.10.2:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 820ms, Maximum = 883ms, Average = 842ms
  1. 'Enter the command to verify connectivity to PC2 at '192.168.10.11'.
    C:\>ping 192.168.10.11
Pinging 192.168.10.11 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.10.11: bytes=32 time=838ms TTL=35
Reply from 192.168.10.11: bytes=32 time=820ms TTL=35
Reply from 192.168.10.11: bytes=32 time=883ms TTL=36
Reply from 192.168.10.11: bytes=32 time=828ms TTL=36
Ping statistics for 192.168.10.11:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 820ms, Maximum = 883ms, Average = 842ms
C:\>

You successfully verified connectivity to S1 and PC2

The figure also has the following 3 buttons:

  • Reset: resets the Syntax Checker
  • Show Me: displays the next step in the configuration process
  • Show All: displays the completed configuration process

2.3.3 Verifying Network Connectivity >2.3.3.4 Lab – Building a Simple Network

See Lab Descriptions.

2.3.3 Verifying Network Connectivity >2.3.3.5 Lab – Configuring a switch Management Interface

See Lab Descriptions.

2.4 summary

2.4.1 Summary >2.4.1.1 Class Activity - Tutor Me

The image on this page shows different people using different devices in their work.

The description given for this image is "The CLI commands the Cisco IOS!"

Objectives

Configure initial settings on a network device using the Cisco IOS software.

In this activity, you will use and reinforce your knowledge of the Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) command-line interface (CLI) by explaining it to other students. You will look for different ways to explain the meaning of individual commands. You will also find the optimal grouping of commands to be used when configuring a device to minimise the necessary count of mode changes.

2.4.1 Summary >2.4.1.2 Packet Tracer - Skills Integration Challenge

Objectives

  • Configure hostnames and IP addresses on two Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) switches using the command-line interface (CLI).
  • Use Cisco IOS commands to specify or limit

access to the device configurations.

  • Use IOS commands to save the running configuration.
  • Configure two host devices with IP addresses.
  • Verify connectivity between the two PC end device

2.4.1 Summary >2.4.1.3 Summary

The figure on this page shows the hierarchical relationship between the different modes of the Cisco IOS:

  • User Exec
  • Privileged Exec
  • Global Configuration
  • etc.

End of learner 2: Configuring a Network Operating System.

Next - learner 3: Network Protocols and Communications.

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Page last modified on September 16, 2014, at 06:51 AM